Author Topic: Why do you love your Caddy?  (Read 3229 times)

Offline 64CaddieLacky

  • Posts: 277
  • Name: C.Asaro
Why do you love your Caddy?
« on: March 04, 2016, 10:00:06 PM »
 Time and time again I ask myself, "Why".

Why do I own the cars I own, and where do I fit in this modern world of people that are into the latest and greatest goods and devices. It's not just old cars I like so much, but everything from old 1920's Victorian style homes to old chromed out appliances, and 60's-70's stereo receivers like Marantz.

Close friends of mine just don't understand the artistic flair and quality that many older things embedded. There was once a time when this country built amazing stuff, from architectural giants with pizzaz like the Empire state building and the Chrysler building, to cool cars and war machines. Today modern designs have gone sleek and boring. New condo towers and office buildings looks horribly generic and bland, they are no match to the old pre war buildings from the 1940's on down that are of gothic type with lots of detail and great shapes and depth. Same for new refrigerators, washer machines and stoves. Bland and more bland with cheap plastic components even on very expensive models. The old 40's-70's appliances were amazing styled and had a lot of quality built into them. I know a guy that still has his grandparents maytag washer machines from 1961, It still works too! I also know a auto shop with mostly old timers that work there, and they have a busted up rusty 1950 refrigerator that has never broke down and is still working to this day. The only problem is that they use a bungee cord to keep the door closed. So there's proof that a lot of older things were better made.

I'm not some old guy that is yearning for the past either, but a young man with an old soul perhaps. Cadillacs used to be cars for the young aspiring professional, now that title since the 90's goes to BMW unfortunately.

Call me crazy, but I love a huge car that floats down the road in complete comfort, looks cool doing so, and with doors and a hood that feels like it's carved out of huge piece of concrete.

Yesterday I parked my 64 next to a 15 CTS, and I just laughed to myself on how lame that Cad looks next to my 64. I mean no offense to the new Caddys out there, but they still look like toys, have no presence  and are a joke compared to Cads from the past regardless how fast and teched out they are.

So why do you love your old Caddy? What makes it so special and awesome to you?  :D
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline Bobby B

  • Posts: 1828
  • Mendham, New Jersey
  • Name: Bob Bender
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2016, 12:19:48 AM »
I'm the only person in my household without a "Smart" Phone, so I hear you. Old School, and always will be. No time, use, or interest for a lot of stuff in today's world. Cars, Music, Life, Architecture, etc. not the same anymore. People have lowered their standards to what's acceptable. Everything now is leased or on credit, and most people are over-extended just to keep up with the Joneses, and the latest and greatest in our newly disposable society. We could go on and on about this, but the reason we do it is because it's something that just makes you feel good, brings back great memories of they way life used to be, and maybe a sense of accomplishment that there is something you own in today's world that is actually repairable, and requires some old fashioned thinking to do it. We hate them when they break or leave us stranded, but we love them even more when we figure out what went wrong and fix it. They feed our heads with a sense of accomplishment that no on else could give you. We should all be proud that we are keeping a bit of history alive. But unfortunately, the hobby is not for everyone, and that might actually be a good thing.  Let's face it, the "Thumbs-up" can really turn a bad day around……
                                                                                          Bobby
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Coupe
1968 Mustang Convertible
1973 Mustang Convertible
1969 Jaguar E-Type Roadster
1971 Datsun 240Z
1979 H-D FLH

Offline 64CaddieLacky

  • Posts: 277
  • Name: C.Asaro
Re: What makes you love your old Caddy so much ?
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2016, 03:03:04 AM »
I'm the only person in my household without a "Smart" Phone, so I hear you. Old School, and always will be. No time, use, or interest for a lot of stuff in today's world. Cars, Music, Life, Architecture, etc. not the same anymore. People have lowered their standards to what's acceptable. Everything now is leased or on credit, and most people are over-extended just to keep up with the Joneses, and the latest and greatest in our newly disposable society. We could go on and on about this, but the reason we do it is because it's something that just makes you feel good, brings back great memories of they way life used to be, and maybe a sense of accomplishment that there is something you own in today's world that is actually repairable, and requires some old fashioned thinking to do it. We hate them when they break or leave us stranded, but we love them even more when we figure out what went wrong and fix it. They feed our heads with a sense of accomplishment that no on else could give you. We should all be proud that we are keeping a bit of history alive. But unfortunately, the hobby is not for everyone, and that might actually be a good thing.  Let's face it, the "Thumbs-up" can really turn a bad day around……
                                                                                          Bobby

True that. Right on Brotha! 8)

Some new things are better, like HDTV's but there is a huge segment of our society that "thinks" something that is new is automatically better. Vacuum cleaners is another example of how crappy appliances have become. I still use my mother's old Kirby Heritage 2 Legend vacuum cleaner that she bought in the 80's which she gave to me. The damn thing just keeps ticking on and there hasn't been any problems with it. It sucks up dust and dirt so much better than the throw away plastic bagless vacs that usually break in a couple of years.

Back on topic.

The thrill and throwback feel that one experiences in a classic Cad is second to none especially when you're cruising to some oldies music, a little Motown like Smokey Robinson, the Temptations or Deano and Sinatra, that in itself takes you back in time and makes you realize how cool and pampered one felt in a Cadillac.  I appreciate and admire the craftsmanship that went into building these old tanks as well. The days when robots didn't exist, Cadillacs were built so precisely and finely that you'd think maybe a Cad or 2 might have slipped past the quality control checklist seeing how many they produced. By the 70's, it was a different time, an era which cost cutting measures were being implemented. But one things for certain, Cadillacs always had the best engineering and powertrain combo compared to the rest of the industry and that has always been Caddys strong suit.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2016, 03:30:33 AM by 64CaddieLacky »
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline Big Apple Caddy

  • Posts: 714
  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2016, 08:14:22 AM »
Why do I own the cars I own, and where do I fit in this modern world of people that are into the latest and greatest goods and devices. It's not just old cars I like so much, but everything from old 1920's Victorian style homes to old chromed out appliances, and 60's-70's stereo receivers like Marantz.

You're just an oddball.  Seriously though, your sentiments are not unique to today and have been repeated for ages although mostly by the older generations of any given time.  There have always been some who prefer classics, or items of the past, over new or contemporary things no matter what the decade.  Decades from now there will be people longing for the “good old days” of the 2010s.

Offline Scot Minesinger

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2016, 08:46:25 AM »
Have written this before, the reason I love my 1970 DeVille Convertible is that it is a rear drive American V-8 Automobile that seats 6.  I got into the hobby in 2005 when I wanted such a car and had to go back to 1970 to buy one.  True, GM had the 71-75 full size scissor top models, but after discovering I had to buy an older car, did the research and Cadillacs from 1968-1970 were the best option in terms of parts availability, cost, style, and of course that great 472 high compression engine.  Bought my red 1970 DVC at a local car show in November.  Over ten years later it still is a joy.

Now, I love it because it drives so nice, looks amazing, so comfortable, and a major eye catcher.  When you increase gas pedal pressure there is no annoying delay or reaction that is detectable when a modern car activates all 8 cylinders.  The climate control is way better than a modern one in terms of comfort and quiet.  Has everything a modern car interior is equipped with except cup holders and nav.  The roads are salted today or I would be driving it.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline Jon S

  • Posts: 1955
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  • Name: J. Schapiro
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2016, 09:07:53 AM »
I love my Caddy because I grew up with it.  My dad went from Oldsmobile 98's to a Buick Roadmaster to the Cadillac.  I was 12 when he brought the new car home.  It was his "Sunday car," so it never saw the rain and we had a 1959 Pontiac for everyday.  Whenever I drive the car, it brings back memories.

I have to say, I enjoy driving it and receiving thumbs up.  I DO NOT enjoy parking it and having non-collectors gauk at it or pass by closely with baby strollers.  Also, there is always someone there (an expert) to inform me that the car is not an original color as they have never seen a Versailles green one before.

I have five cars . . . three classics, a becoming classic 2004 Mustang GT and a Jeep Grand Cherokee.  I tend to use the Jeep quite a bit as I'm not afraid to park it and leave it as I do my chores.  Even my 1998 grand Cherokee with 246,000 miles looks like new and I park it far away from the crowds and walk to my destination.

Bottom line - it's wonderful to have a beautiful classic, but it's work to keep it that way.
Jon

1958 Cadillac Sedan De Ville
1973 Lincoln Continental Coupe
1981 Corvette
2004 Mustang GT

Offline gary griffin

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  • Name: Gary Griffin
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2016, 10:17:07 AM »
Whats not to love? My only real problem is undersized garage (4 bays and a lift) and bank account. Retirement would be boring without the challenges of restoring and maintaining my cars and motorcycles.

Every vehicle has a different appeal to me. One example is my 1957 60S. I got my drivers license in November of 1956, and went to a new car show and fell in love with the 57 Cadillac's, and finally I have one. My LaSalle is my Birth year car. The 42 just snuck up and fell in my lap sorta!  I need 1/3 of the house I now have and 3 times the garage.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 12:02:26 PM by gary griffin »
Gary Griffin

1940 LaSalle 5029 4 door convertible sedan
1942 Cadillac 6719 restoration almost complete?
1942 Cadillac 6719 (parts car) (Gone)
1957 Cadillac 60-special (Needs a little TLC)

Offline 59-in-pieces

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  • Name: S. Butcher
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2016, 11:04:49 AM »
IMHO - our classic Caddy's  ground us.
They act as our touchstones - center us - when things start going sideways.
They offer stability in an otherwise warp speed, me first,  disposable world.
I can remember my Dad - who had Cads for as long as I could recall - bringing home his new 1965, and remarking - When did Cadillac get so much plastic - bending to the relentless competition of the bottom line (no offense to the owners of 65's, gr8 cars).
I can recall about to get my drivers license in High School, and my Dad asking me if I wanted Mom's Cad - which was to be traded in for his new Cad.  The answer was quick, NO, those cars are for old people (yikes it's a wonder I wasn't knocked into next week calling my Dad old).
And, when did the Lemon Laws go into effect, as an indictment against automotive design and construction - but I don't recall they were focused on Cads.
Boy have things changed - and me too -
Just let me climb into my time capsule - drive away - and I'm a happy man.
Have fun,
Steve B.
S. Butcher

Offline LenInLA

  • Posts: 121
  • Name: Leonard Grayver
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2016, 10:55:02 PM »
I think it's genetic. I like "old" things. My office is filled with late 18th century American furniture and various antiques. Makes me happy to look at them. If it were up to my wife we'd change everything every few years.

Old luxury cars don't drive as well as new luxury cars. I've driven the new caddies and they are better - in every respect - than my 76 Eldorado. So frankly I don't much agree with the folks who claim their 1970 caddy drives better than a 2016 model.

I think we like old cars because we like old houses; old appliances; old furniture. It's not a rational 'like', but just a very subjective - and somewhat uncommon - sentiment.

Offline StevenTuck

  • Posts: 597
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  • Name: Steven M. Tuck
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2016, 06:02:05 AM »
I guess it has to have a beginning point where you first saw one and knew that car was for you. Then the yearning would grow as time past until you got one. Then you get it and tinker or restore and drive it. That drive could be to a car show or on a trip somewhere. All this time spent with the car cements the bond. Then add the awards, memorabilia and car friends. When all is said and done how else could one feel. The car becomes an extension of yourself. You escape into another world separate from the daily grind. You experience the "Standard of the World".
1962 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz
http://bit.ly/1NfPNHE
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Offline Caddyholic

  • Posts: 216
  • 1961 Series 62 Convertible 1962 Coupe Deville
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  • Name: Jim Lumma
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2016, 01:30:20 PM »
Because it's not a chevy. Everybody owns a chevy.
I got myself a Cadillac but I can't afford the gasoline (AC/DC Down Payment Blues)

1961 Series 62 Convertible Coupe http://bit.ly/1RCYsVZ
1962 Coupe Deville

Offline signart

  • Posts: 197
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2016, 08:34:06 AM »
How I roll.. and how I chill... pretty much the same reasons. Hard to impress me with anything new.

Art D. Woody

Offline cadillac ken

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  • Name: k caskey
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2016, 09:14:08 AM »
C. Asaro:  I couldn't agree more with all you said.  And even though I am an old guy now, I always gravitated to the old cars.  Even in High School when all my buddies lusted after the "new" muscle cars; '69 Mustangs, '70 Challengers and Cudas, Camaros, etc. I was driving my '36 Ford.  They didn't get it.

Why do I love my old Cadillacs?  The quality. The style and design of even the simple things like knobs and handles. The feeling like designers actually thought about every thing they put on paper.  But most of all the appreciation of the dedication of these engineers and designers to constantly push themselves to revamp and redesign a new look and new car every year without the use of computers. Working hand and hand and achieving a remarkable level of quality and fit with most everything working in perfect synchronicity.

For me being an artist at heart, I just could not resist the curves, style, and detail of the old stuff.  As I got older, my appreciation for these cars only grew. These are cars that could only be built in America.  Wide open roads, wide open spaces allowed for the huge wheelbases and stances of the classics from the 20's and 30's.  Folks often wonder aloud to me about the imports of the time: "why so small?".  They don't realize that most european countries have tight roads, limited parking spaces, and that some alleyways doubled as roads.  Not very conducive to the huge rolling works of art we were fortunate to have had here in America.

I guess the new generations have just grown accustom to a throw away existence.  Maybe they don't expect things to last or maybe the manufacturers realize today's consumer quickly tires of their purchases.  Maybe it's just a catch 22: Make cheap unimaginative products because you know the consumer is easily bored or is it the consumer is easily bored because you make cheap unimaginative products (?)

Maybe there's still hope.  As I have aged my tasted have changed some.  I have grown to appreciate antique furniture more than I used to.  When I was young I couldn't have cared less about a remarkable Art Deco bedroom set. Good on you for being a younger guy and being ahead of the curve!

Offline Big Apple Caddy

  • Posts: 714
  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2016, 10:27:19 AM »
Regarding today's "throw away" society, cars on average are lasting longer in recent decades than decades past.  Thanks to longer/better warranties, less rust issues, etc., it is much more common to see 10+ year old vehicles on the road as daily drivers today than it was decades ago.   Cars used to be parked/junked much more quickly.  The average age of cars on the road today is over 11 years but it was less than half that 50+ years ago.  The car market used to be much more "throw away" than it is today.

Offline cadillac ken

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2016, 11:24:04 AM »
... except for the knobs that fall off, the handles that break, the A/C system failures, the plastic (instead of bronze) bushings that rapidly deteriorate and fall apart. The plastic gears that strip, Leather that is worn out at less than 10K miles, yes, I agree.  Today's cars are less rusty and run better longer.

I own a very expensive import that has had the shifter bushings replaced, the shift rod fail (with the replacement bushing swedged on so instead of replacing the bushings you have to replace the entire rod at $180). The plastic gear in the odometer has failed twice (send off and have repaired-- three weeks without a speedo). And am on my 3rd, yes, 3rd A/C evaporator due to poor engineering which results in leaks (aluminum and copper combo-- how that works I couldn't tell you).  Oh and had to replace an aluminum A/C line because the manufacturer didn't get the concept of Cathodic reaction (steel clamp with no rubber insulator that would have cost all of about .05.)

I admit today's cars "last longer" but the build quality of the little things will drive you nuts if you do decide to keep a car for any length of time.  And of course the manufacturers are counting on the fact that you won't.

 

Offline D.Yaros

  • The Gray Lady, a '55 Coupe de Ville
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  • Name: Dave Yaros
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2016, 01:06:23 PM »
Regarding today's "throw away" society, cars on average are lasting longer in recent decades than decades past.  Thanks to longer/better warranties, less rust issues, etc., it is much more common to see 10+ year old vehicles on the road as daily drivers today than it was decades ago.   Cars used to be parked/junked much more quickly.  The average age of cars on the road today is over 11 years but it was less than half that 50+ years ago.  The car market used to be much more "throw away" than it is today.

Back in the 50's, once/if a car racked up 50K on the odometer it was time to start looking for a replacement vehicle!
Dave Yaros
CLC #25195
55 Coupe de Ville
92 Allante
62 Olds  

You will find me on the web @:
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The home of Car Collector Chronicles.  A  monthly GDYNets newsletter focusing on classic car collecting.
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Offline Caddyholic

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  • Name: Jim Lumma
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2016, 03:11:34 PM »
Ken Don't buy imports.

GM perfected plan obsolesces. (Cadillac included) It was Al Sloans Matra.
I got myself a Cadillac but I can't afford the gasoline (AC/DC Down Payment Blues)

1961 Series 62 Convertible Coupe http://bit.ly/1RCYsVZ
1962 Coupe Deville

Offline Joe Vastola

  • Posts: 189
  • Name: Joe Vastola
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2016, 08:44:10 PM »
A love of old cars was passed down and took hold many many years ago.  But for me, my Cadillac has history, life lessons, and memories that will last a life time.
1949 Series 62 Convertible http://bit.ly/1KCDWiN

Go here http://bit.ly/1W6z6pE to add pictures of your beautiful Cadillacs to your profile so we can all enjoy!

Offline Scot Minesinger

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2016, 10:07:06 PM »
I'm with Caddyholic, don't buy imports.  My 2006 Dodge Charger hemi was purchased 09/2005 and it just turned over 102k miles.  It looks and drives brand new, and my teenage kids put 40k of that mileage on it.  Once I bought my 1985 Caprice w/305 V-8 used in 1987 every American car has lasted as long as I wanted to drive and maintain it.  The 1978 Olds Delta 88 before the Caprice exemplified GM bad quality - parts failed frequently, knobs broke, just terrible build quality. 

Usually I drive them to 200k miles or ten years.  Now I work at home and so cars last longer.

Seriously any car now has so much computer and high tech stuff, not sure I would buy one without some extended dealer warranty.

My 1970 Cadillacs need more attention.  They always seem to need a little something.  They are more work than the newer cars.  But they are worth it.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline 64CaddieLacky

  • Posts: 277
  • Name: C.Asaro
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2016, 10:09:00 PM »
I think if a person simply maintained an old 40's-70's Cadillac and kept it in tip top shape, I don't think there was any reason why they couldn't last way over 100,000 miles. Cadillac engineering was the best of the best at the time.

Sure there's more smaller things to fail on an old car, or a vacuum hose to leak, but generally Cadillacs back then were overbuilt. In my experience my 64 has held up amazingly well for how old it is.

Zero cracks on the dash, door panels that are in pristine condition, all the chrome is still bright and shiny with no pitting. Steering wheel is also in great shape. Pretty much the entire interior is in very nice shape besides for some cracks on the driver's seat (typical), and slight wear on the passenger's side, but everything is original and for it's age, I am very surprised by the quality of the fit and finish and the longevity of the materials used during these years. And like some have mentioned already that these old Caddys were built by craftsman with real skills, no robotics to make sure every line was even, or measurements were exact.

Nothing cheap or plastic to break or fall off either. I honestly believe Cadillacs of the 50's-70's were designed to last a longer time than what many people expected.

 It's just like that little old lady that still drives her 57 Chevy Bel Air that was purchased new. It's her daily driver and should wouldn't drive anything else.

Check out the vid!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwcRG2aEi3s
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

 

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