Author Topic: Why do you love your Caddy?  (Read 3283 times)

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #40 on: March 29, 2016, 06:34:21 AM »
I honestly find it hard to believe certain specs that automakers claim sometimes when it comes to interior dimensions.

For instance my 94 Fleetwood Bro legroom specs seem untrue. The specs are

Front legroom 42.5 inches
Rear legroom  43.9 inches

Now there is no way that the rear seat legroom is anywhere near close to being 44 inches, because just sitting back there, the legroom seems tight especially with the seat all the way back, or even half way back. The dimensions can't be accurate.

But in my 64, the rear seat legroom seems much greater even though the specs are a good 2-3 inches less than the 94 Fleet.

And in my 78 Lincoln Continental, the specs are like 42 inches of rear seat legroom, but that car triumphs both my 94 and my 64 Cadillacs in rear seat leg and knee room, it's like sitting in a mini limo in that car plus the shoulder room seems and feels much greater than in my Cadillacs.

I guess the absolute best part of owning my 64 is it's quality of materials, fit and finish, and chrome trim everywhere. I am really big on quality and how a car is built, because if you'r buying a luxury car, you want to make sure that the company didn't cheapen out on anything, and I believe Cadillacs up to 65 were the pinnacle and the last of what Cadillac truly strived for when it built it's cars before the bean counters and cost cutting measures took effect the years that came after.  Not to take away the greatness of the later Cadillacs, because they are all great cars in their own right, and looked very sharp as well

But I can't stand cheap plastic in cars, but I understand the use of it. We can't escape it either especially in modern cars, including most of today's luxury cars, so this another reason why I so love my 64 to death, it's oozes class, and a sense of a well built machine, nothing cheap inside that I can find. Everytime the car is parked somewhere and I see someone checking it out, everyone that sees it usually makes the same exact comments to me.

"Wow look at all that beautiful chrome and tail fins, Man.....now THAT'S a REAL Cadillac!"  8) :D

I guarantee you, nobody is going to walk up to the owner of a DTS or an STS, or a CTS and say the same thing.

 
« Last Edit: March 29, 2016, 06:55:01 AM by 64CaddieLacky »
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #41 on: March 29, 2016, 07:53:58 AM »
Someone was drunk with the power seat switch when they took those measurements. The front seat in EVERY RWD 1968 Cadillac has the same dimensions except the Fleetwood 75 which were a bit taller and had a little more headroom. I've owned and driven 1968, 69 and 70m Cadillacs and aside from options and seat material (and seat backs) they are virtually the same up front. This includes Fleetwood 75 cars.

1968 measurements are according to 1968 Cadillac Data Book, each listed has less front legroom than the 2006-2011 DTS.

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #42 on: March 29, 2016, 07:56:39 AM »
I honestly find it hard to believe certain specs that automakers claim sometimes when it comes to interior dimensions.

Interior measurements are supposed to be based on guidelines provided by SAE International, for example:

All Interior Dimensions are defined with an adjustable front seat in its rearmost normal driving position, resulting in the Design H-Point being positioned at the Seating Reference Point (SgRP) position. All other adjustable features, such as an adjustable steering wheel and adjustable seat height, a seatback that adjusts independently from the Seat Cushion, power 4-way or 6-way seats, etc., shall be positioned in their normal driving position as specified by the manufacturer. Steering wheel shall be positioned with from the wheels in straight-ahead position.

All interior dimensions for designated seated positions are defined on the Y-Plane centerline of the occupant, unless otherwise defined in the dimensions definition. The H-Point machine and two-dimensional drafting template specified in SAE J826 shall use the 95th percentile leg segments.

For heavy-duty trucks, suspension seats will be positioned as specified by the vehicle manufacturer in the normal driving position with any fore and aft isolator locked out.

MAXIMUM LEG ROOM-ACCELERATOR—The dimension measured along a line from the Ankle Pivot Center to the Rearmost Design H-Point (see 14.1) plus 254 mm (10 in) measured with the right foot on the Undepressed Accelerator Pedal defined from the SgRP location. The Rearmost Highest or Rearmost Lowest Design H-Point location, or any point in between, may be used if a larger value is obtained. This assumes that the seat is not rotated and design Cushion Angle is maintained. For vehicles with SgRP to heel (H30) greater than 405 mm, the accelerator pedal may be depressed as specified by the manufacturer. If the accelerator is depressed, the manufacturer shall place foot flat on pedal and note the depression of the pedal.

EFFECTIVE SGRP LEG ROOM-ACCELERATOR—The dimension measured along a line from the Ankle Pivot Center to the SgRP-front plus 254 mm (10 in) measured with right foot on the Undepressed Accelerator Pedal. For vehicles with SgRP to heel (H30) greater than 405 mm, the accelerator pedal may be depressed as specified by the manufacturer. If the accelerator is depressed, the manufacturer shall place foot flat on pedal and note the depression of the pedal.

EFFECTIVE SGRP LEG ROOM-SECOND—The dimension measured along a line from the Ankle Pivot Center to the SgRP-second plus 254 mm (10 in). The foot may be placed on the floor pan with the centerline of the leg segment up to 127 mm either side of the Y plane occupant centerline.

Offline cadillacmike68

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #43 on: March 29, 2016, 04:14:58 PM »
1968 measurements are according to 1968 Cadillac Data Book, each listed has less front legroom than the 2006-2011 DTS.

The fact still remains that all the Calais and DeVilles have identical wheelbases, and the coupes and convertibles have the same size doors. Maybe the mounting holes in the body are in slightly different places. 

Plus,  and this is significant, the newer cars have a Much longer seat travel. My 1996 goes so far back that I could not hope to reach the pedals and I'm not short.

On rear leg foot, they newer cars count open area under the front seats.  This was decidedly not necessary in 60s and 70s 133" wb Fleetwood Broughams, because they were so huge in the back seat, they had footrests back there!

Cool, so the new cars with the long throw travel measure front legroom with the seat all the way back. I'll bet they measure rear leg room with the front seat all the way forward.  :P

The full size FWDs do have a nice expansive front leg room I remember my LeSabre had the same space ad the DeVilles back in 1992, but that's because they are FWD and the floor could be kept wider. Heck, even 1990s - early 2000s Eldorados & Sevilles have impressive front leg room.

But we are getting off the topic here.

I honestly find it hard to believe certain specs that automakers claim sometimes when it comes to interior dimensions.

For instance my 94 Fleetwood Bro legroom specs seem untrue. The specs are

Front legroom 42.5 inches
Rear legroom  43.9 inches

Now there is no way that the rear seat legroom is anywhere near close to being 44 inches, because just sitting back there, the legroom seems tight especially with the seat all the way back, or even half way back. The dimensions can't be accurate.

But in my 64, the rear seat legroom seems much greater even though the specs are a good 2-3 inches less than the 94 Fleet.

And in my 78 Lincoln Continental, the specs are like 42 inches of rear seat legroom, but that car triumphs both my 94 and my 64 Cadillacs in rear seat leg and knee room, it's like sitting in a mini limo in that car plus the shoulder room seems and feels much greater than in my Cadillacs.

I guess the absolute best part of owning my 64 is it's quality of materials, fit and finish, and chrome trim everywhere. I am really big on quality and how a car is built, because if you'r buying a luxury car, you want to make sure that the company didn't cheapen out on anything, and I believe Cadillacs up to 65 were the pinnacle and the last of what Cadillac truly strived for when it built it's cars before the bean counters and cost cutting measures took effect the years that came after.  Not to take away the greatness of the later Cadillacs, because they are all great cars in their own right, and looked very sharp as well

But I can't stand cheap plastic in cars, but I understand the use of it. We can't escape it either especially in modern cars, including most of today's luxury cars, so this another reason why I so love my 64 to death, it's oozes class, and a sense of a well built machine, nothing cheap inside that I can find. Everytime the car is parked somewhere and I see someone checking it out, everyone that sees it usually makes the same exact comments to me.

"Wow look at all that beautiful chrome and tail fins, Man.....now THAT'S a REAL Cadillac!"  8) :D

I guarantee you, nobody is going to walk up to the owner of a DTS or an STS, or a CTS and say the same thing.

I partly agree with you 64. however, I don't think the quality started decreasing until 1971 or 72.  And the late 60s cars have a much better engine.  The materials in my 1968, and the 69 & 70s that I had when I was younger are top quality. Besides, the use of (durable) plastic lamp sockets (with their own ground wires!) means you don't have to remove half the rear bumper to change a tail light like you have to do in a 65. even a side marker or cornering light requires a lot of disassembly to change out.

Lincoln didn't down size until 1979, so a 77 or 78 Lincoln was the same as the 76 and earlier Cadillacs and those Lincoln sedans were big.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2016, 04:25:04 PM by cadillacmike68 »
Regards,
"Cadillac" Mike
Current:
1968 DeVille Convertible
1996 Fleetwood Brougham
2009 STS NorthStar Platinum ed RWD
2011 CTS PRemiun ed Sedan RWD
Past:
2008 CTS Premium ed Sedan AWD
2005 CTS Hi-Feature Sedan RWD
2000 ElDorado ESC Hard Boot Convertible
1995 Fleetwood Brougham
1973 Sedan DeVille
1970 Fleetwood Brougham
1969 DeVille Convertible

Offline Scot Minesinger

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #44 on: March 29, 2016, 08:58:53 PM »
Mike,

79 was the last year of the Large Lincoln (same as 76), but 78 was the last year of the 460 engine in a car (still in trucks), the 79 had a 400 engine.  My friend's Dad in high school bought one because it was the last year, very underpowered.  My 1968 Thunderbird would eat it alive on the open road, well on any road as it handled and stopped better too.


All,

I think the quality of cars started to drop off quickly in 1975, as I notice fit and finish, wiring and the like really is not amazing in a 1975 Cadillac compared to a 74. I think innovation really reduced in mid 1960's, as not much new great ideas emerged much after 1970 (first year of anti-lock brakes):

1960 Cadillac compared to a 1970, better brakes, better engine, better transmission, climate control, tilt wheel, twilight sentinel, and etc.  Now the 1960 is cooler looking though.  Don't get me wrong the 1960 is quite nice and desirable.  Look at the 1980 Cadillac as compared to the 1970, the 1970 is superior or equal technologically.  I wrote this just to show that between 1960 and 1970 there were many improvements, whereas there were not between 1970 and 1980 comparatively.

Drove my 1970 Cadillac today, and it is so fun to have all these people admire it and ask questions - one of my favorite things about the Cadillacs!
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #45 on: March 30, 2016, 12:50:01 AM »
Mike,

79 was the last year of the Large Lincoln (same as 76), but 78 was the last year of the 460 engine in a car (still in trucks), the 79 had a 400 engine.  My friend's Dad in high school bought one because it was the last year, very underpowered.  My 1968 Thunderbird would eat it alive on the open road, well on any road as it handled and stopped better too.


All,

I think the quality of cars started to drop off quickly in 1975, as I notice fit and finish, wiring and the like really is not amazing in a 1975 Cadillac compared to a 74. I think innovation really reduced in mid 1960's, as not much new great ideas emerged much after 1970 (first year of anti-lock brakes):

1960 Cadillac compared to a 1970, better brakes, better engine, better transmission, climate control, tilt wheel, twilight sentinel, and etc.  Now the 1960 is cooler looking though.  Don't get me wrong the 1960 is quite nice and desirable.  Look at the 1980 Cadillac as compared to the 1970, the 1970 is superior or equal technologically.  I wrote this just to show that between 1960 and 1970 there were many improvements, whereas there were not between 1970 and 1980 comparatively.

Drove my 1970 Cadillac today, and it is so fun to have all these people admire it and ask questions - one of my favorite things about the Cadillacs!

You know Scott, I almost came close to buying a Tan 69 Sedan Deville while I had my 72 Cad many many years ago. It was in top notch shape, and very clean as well. I clearly remember going for a test drive and feeling a very big difference in not only the solidarity, but the extra power of the pre-smog 472, the build quality and even the ride quality was much better in the 69, than my 72 was. You hardly felt any bumps in that car. The 69's and 70 are also one of my favorite Cadillacs.

The huge shark like grill, tall massive hood, and the fender lines really make them pretty bad ass looking! But yeah by the downsized years, Cadillacs were still Caddys persay into the 80's if we're talking Broughams specifically, but the really last of true great ones probably was the 70, but for the Eldorados, I would say up until 76.

My 78 Lincoln is slow, lol, the 400 is so underpowered, but it's not that bad. On the freeway it's a dream to drive and can easily keep up with traffic, I just have to be extra careful not to get too comfortable because the car can literally make you fall asleep as the car cradles you down the road, it's that quiet, and plush riding.  ;D
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #46 on: March 30, 2016, 03:55:09 AM »
I love the fact that Cadillac decided to place the 8.2 Litre badge into the front fender spear in 1972.

There is nothing nicer than pulling up in a line of traffic, with vehicle/s, on either side, and seeing the driver, or passenger looking at the car, then seeing the 8.2 Litre badge.   Their eyes open wider, and their bottom jaw drops, knowing that their car has an engine so much smaller than they thought possible.

Bruce. >:D
'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
'02 VX Series II Holden Commodore SS Sedan
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Online Tpicks55

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #47 on: April 03, 2016, 03:56:49 PM »
Its funny when I was growing up I always wanted a car with style.  I could never own a cadillac until recently while getting close to retirement.  I use to drool over the 70's cadillacs and one day I bought one and now restoring it.  While doing this I bought a 94 Deville which just to drive around.  I love the way it floats and accelerates.  I just recently went and drove a couple new cadillacs.  I was really in love with the looks but upon driving them I was left with a dissapointment.  They ride  more stiff and I felt the road bumps more  than I thought I should have.  Needless to say  I probably will just stay with my old cad and keep it running.
75 Eldorado Convertable
94 Devill Concurs
13 Chevy Avalanche
2016 Cadillac XTS

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #48 on: April 03, 2016, 08:15:19 PM »
Its funny when I was growing up I always wanted a car with style.  I could never own a cadillac until recently while getting close to retirement.  I use to drool over the 70's cadillacs and one day I bought one and now restoring it.  While doing this I bought a 94 Deville which just to drive around.  I love the way it floats and accelerates.  I just recently went and drove a couple new cadillacs.  I was really in love with the looks but upon driving them I was left with a dissapointment.  They ride  more stiff and I felt the road bumps more  than I thought I should have.  Needless to say  I probably will just stay with my old cad and keep it running.


The new ones might be very quiet, handle great and have every single new tech feat on the market, but one thing that has been missing in the newish Cadillacs for years is that very soft, isolated smooth ride that you got in a older RWD Cadillac. You really can't achieve that kind of ride quality without a long wheelbase, soft springs, and a very solid body construction especially with most new luxury cars having larger wheels and rubber band tires..
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 08:17:04 PM by 64CaddieLacky »
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline 59-in-pieces

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #49 on: April 14, 2016, 10:22:05 AM »
What makes us love our Cadillac cars.....
We drive what was once the STANDARD OF THE WORLD.
The Cadillac brand was synonymous with:
INNOVATION IN THE MECHANICAL WORKINGS OF AUTOMOBILES - but no more,
CUTTING EDGE DESIGNS - but no more,
SOPHISTICATED CREATURE COMFORTS - but no more.
AND A FIRM GRIP ON STATUS "HEY, LOOK AT ME -  I'VE MADE IT" - but sadly no more.

What do you think of when you see a:
Mercedes - great engineering, lasts for ever, status
BMW - powerful, road worthy, youthful,
Lexus & Infinity - over priced, almost made it, on my way to a BMW or Mercedes.
Lincoln - tying to catch up,
Newer Cadillac - Oliver Twist - "Please sir, may I have some more" - a fading actress trying to recapture old glories - SAD TO SAY.

If we're told to "DARE GREATLY", then act bold, don't sneak up on it with baby steps, but go after it - RELEASE THE HOUNDS and build - and as with NIKI "JUST DO IT"

CIEL
EL MIRAJ
V 16
ELR CONVERJ (?)
ECOJET

The soap box is now yours.
Have fun,
Steve B.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 10:29:37 AM by 59-in-pieces »
S. Butcher

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2016, 11:02:22 AM »
Mercedes - great engineering, lasts for ever, status
Mercedes-Benz isn't quite the great engineering, status symbol, etc. it used to be.  Their world changed starting in the 1990s when Lexus and Infiniti came in with less expensive, quality (perceived or genuine) products that took a lot of business from Mercedes-Benz as well as Cadillac and others.

Prior to then, Mercedes-Benz used to be high priced cars that often sold for at or near sticker price.  After the Japanese luxury invasion, Mercedes-Benz was offering big incentives, cutting sticker prices, etc. and the new competition was forcing them to push out products more hastily than before.


BMW - powerful, road worthy, youthful,
They too were affected by the new Japanese competition.


Lexus & Infinity - over priced, almost made it, on my way to a BMW or Mercedes.
I wouldn't necessarily call them overpriced.  They helped push the luxury market down in price.


Lincoln - tying to catch up,
Newer Cadillac - Oliver Twist - "Please sir, may I have some more" - a fading actress trying to recapture old glories - SAD TO SAY.
Both affected by new and stronger import competition.

Cadillac, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz and other luxury brands are competing against each other today more than ever.  Overall, I'd say the imports are winning because today's market wants the attributes imports were known for more than they want the attributes that once made Cadillac and Lincoln popular.  Cruising land-yacht coupes and sedans just aren't "in" like they once were.

Offline 59-in-pieces

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #51 on: April 14, 2016, 12:58:04 PM »
Perception is REALITY.
Marketing puts forth the images, and we interpret them, and convert our perceptions into actions, of buying, and more popularly leasing, our cars.
And sadly still - even after dissecting each marque - the inescapable conclusion is that Cadillac is no longer the Standard of the World.
Cadillac - there is much more work which needs to be done, before that perception can return.
In the mean time, like others in this group, I will continue to drive and enjoy my classic Cads, and one XLR.
Signing off this subject - don't need a Pen Pal.
Have fun,
Steve B.
S. Butcher

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #52 on: April 16, 2016, 09:39:55 PM »
Marketing in a way is a tool that used to deceive and lie to the general public. Some of it can be honest, but the majority of what we see on TV, in print Ads, or online is all "Fluff".

But a lot of people are really stupid and fall into the marketing trap and believe or think that what they just saw on TV is a "must" have item because a celebrity told them so. ???

People need to think for themselves, and not allow others to dictate what is cool, what is popular, and kind of cars they should be driving.

It's like with all these tiny compact and subcompact cars all over the road, whoever is marketing those toys on wheels is doing a genius job on brain washing people into buying such death traps and advertising them as the next "Cool car to be seen in" Ala the Fiat 500. :o

I personally don't fall for such things, and my Classic Cad, and the majority of the classic Cadillacs look a million times better than the new ones, and I guarantee you, bystanders, and onlookers will give the old Cadillacs way more attention, focus and props than any new CTS, ATS or XTS on the road. Because the new Cads simply lack the excitement, they lack the presence, the sleek Sexy "Bad Ass"Cadillac styling, and acres of chrome for anyone to even care. The old Cadillacs make you feel like a Boss, while the new ones??? Fuggutboutit.  :-\
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline Blade

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #53 on: April 16, 2016, 11:02:06 PM »
What makes us love our Cadillac cars.....
We drive what was once the STANDARD OF THE WORLD.
The Cadillac brand was synonymous with:
INNOVATION IN THE MECHANICAL WORKINGS OF AUTOMOBILES - but no more,
CUTTING EDGE DESIGNS - but no more,
SOPHISTICATED CREATURE COMFORTS - but no more.
AND A FIRM GRIP ON STATUS "HEY, LOOK AT ME -  I'VE MADE IT" - but sadly no more.
The whole problem started when Cadillac (and others) started to compete and 'mimic' the imports. Copies usually don't turn out as good as originals (except for the Japanese) but that's what we see with these cars even today: trying to copy to compete with others and when you are busy copying others you can never be a leader. Public opinion has shifted about what luxury and leaders should be from the 'you made it' to 'now you have to work even harder' and cars have to follow that. This required US car manufacturers to go through a dramatic change while others were already setup for this trend as Europe and Japan never had a 'you made it' luxury vehicle just practical quality cars. Cadillac was a leader because it realized the new trends themselves and adjusted to them themselves. For the past few decades this seems to be answered from looking at others and when you're looking at others you follow others. This is the problem that needs to be corrected and for Cadillac (or anyone) to be a leader just need to believing in their own intuitions, talents and just themselves again.
Tibor K.

1959 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1959 Cadillac Series 62 Sedan

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #54 on: April 17, 2016, 07:54:51 AM »
The whole problem started when Cadillac (and others) started to compete and 'mimic' the imports.

I think it was an unavoidable situation.  Cadillac saw their traditional models in sales declines while luxury imports were on the rise.  They either had to 'mimic' the imports, where the customers were going, or be satisfied with lower and lower sales since fewer and fewer contemporary buyers wanted the types of cars that once made Cadillac popular.

It was a lot easier for Cadillac to compete when their competition was basically just Lincoln.  It was a lot easier for Cadillac to be doing well when domestics overall were doing better.  Excluding pickups, ALL of the top 10 selling vehicles in the U.S. last year were import brand models.

New and stronger import competition plus changing tastes towards imports created an all-new ballgame.  Cadillac had to change because the buyers and the market did.

Offline Scot Minesinger

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #55 on: April 19, 2016, 07:25:12 AM »
Cadillac currently is coming back (positive momentum) and starting to offer the right product, but it is going to be a while until they have a full product offering.  I think a CT6 coupe and CT6 convertible (or coupe only with retractable metal hardtop - that looks good) would really be a move in finishing off the line nicely.  The CT6 sales upcoming will determine a lot about their future.

Funny we all have our perceptions of marketing, and being biased on Cadillac, my impressions of luxury brands are:

MB, nice, but trading on their name is what I hear from a lot of people that drive them.  Probably could enjoy a nice S series with a V-8.

BMW, I have driven these cars and they are terrible.  The 5 series V-6 is not powerful, not comfortable and poorly laid out, rather drive a 1995 Malibu.

Lexus, reliable nice, but do not care for the current styling

Infiniti, reliable OK, but again do not care for the styling

Jag:  The XJ would be the one to get and probably could enjoy that car.

In any event with any new car would not buy one without an extensive FACTORY warranty, inclusive of loner car program.

Back to the topic- classic Cadillacs why:  There is nothing like them, they drive very well and keep up with modern traffic, which is a miracle considering they are 40 to 50 years old.  Try driving a 1925 Cadillac in 1970 traffic.  When I'm driving my 1970 Cadillacs many other drivers are envious.



Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #56 on: April 19, 2016, 10:39:22 PM »
If all is well, and the braking system is up to snuff, I don't see why a 50's-70's Cadillac can't be driven on a daily basis.

One thing I really miss in new cars, including new Cadillacs, is the massive interiors. The CT6 will probably still feel kinda small compared to our Classics. Imagine driving a 70's Fleetwood around town? I mean back in the day, you could easily  fit like 8 people in one of those, and go for a night out in supreme comfort, style, and feel like a President or a King. Nothing today even comes close to giving you that "Statesman" like feeling as the old ones do. I really miss that in the classic Cads.

The only other modern car I can think of that would be on par to a Fleetwood, especially to a 65 Fleetwood Bro, would be a RR Phantom. Obviously the Phantom is a superior car, but for size comparison and overall luxury, that would be the closest classic luxury car I can think of that I'd rather be chauffeured in if I was a rich man.
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline Acmemopars

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Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #57 on: February 13, 2018, 04:54:39 PM »
This is why.

I've been recycling cars for 26 years, mostly Mopars and those are one of my favs... but the car below is a 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Seville that has been garaged and turned off, sitting since 1979.  Parked because someone stole the dual carbs and intake.  I bought it in as-is condition, not running, motor locked up, interior dirty and dusty, flat tires from the 70's still on it, and unsure of what I was in for.

This car is a survivor and still wears its original interior, seats, carpet and headliner, cloth top, paint, number's matching 365 dual carb motor and tranny (both rebuilt).  It cleaned up great, runs great and it still looks good and everything still works (except the clock).  There is very little plastic or anything else for that matter that wears out or deteriorates, a few things, but not many.

The muscle cars of the 70's (love em) just don't last like these old Caddys.

Why you ask ?
Because of cars like "Macho Grande" below :)




Mike Nelson
Denison, Tx
CLC# 31194

57 Eldo Survivor
70 Sunroof Charger 1 of 1
56 F100

Offline Cape Cod Fleetwood

  • Posts: 211
  • Name: Laurie Kraynick
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #58 on: February 13, 2018, 11:58:34 PM »
What a fun thread to read. The emotion from so many was so real.
Whether a rolling museum or a personal time capsule (as is my case), aren't we all so -
blessed?
With that blessing comes the responsibility to The Car to keep it alive for generations to come
and to share it with those who show interest, they are the future caretakers of these cars when we die.
We are all so lucky, so blessed.
Laurie!
There are 2 kinds of cars in the world, Cadillac and everything else....

The Present -1970 Fleetwood Brougham

The Past -
1996 Deville Concours
1987 Sedan De Ville "Commonwealth Edition"
1981 Coupe De Ville (8-6-4)
1976 Sedan De Ville
1975 Sedan De Ville

The Daily Driver and work slave -
2008 GMC Acadia SLT *options/all

Offline BJM

  • Posts: 429
Re: Why do you love your Caddy?
« Reply #59 on: February 14, 2018, 07:34:03 AM »
Why do I love my 68 Eldorado?  I believe it is my favorite car of all time and I have owned well over 275 cars from 20 + manufacturers. It's the only one I come back to. 

Physical beauty, basically rolling art to me.  But a unique driving experience as well. Nobody else made it or figured it out, except Cadillac. 
Bryan J Moran
CLC # 12994
Des Moines, Iowa
1968 Cadillac Eldorado

 

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