Author Topic: hoarders of cars  (Read 809 times)

Offline James Landi

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hoarders of cars
« on: November 01, 2017, 06:48:14 AM »
 Every so often on this interesting web site, some one makes a gentle and generally humorous  aside about some individual who stores his seemingly abandoned unloved, well used and abused vehicles outside for years and years. I'm interested in "your take" on some of these gentlemen who "collect" reasonably repairable cars and then, through their benign neglect, allow them to gradually melt into the organic environment into which they sink. I in no way wish to be critical... simply attempting to have some of your insights, as I am of an entirely different "mind set" when I comes to old toys that I wish to see "go to good homes."   Thoughts,   James

Offline Barry M Wheeler #2189

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2017, 07:59:04 AM »
James, One instance that comes to mind if the fairly recent posting of the picture of the Brougham Town Car. The owner must have gotten a lot of satisfaction over the years telling "everyone" who asked to buy it, either that it wasn't for sale, or quoting an outrageous price. I am of two minds. First of course is that the owner beat us to it, and can do whatever he wishes with the car. And then the feelings that many of us have, "Why didn't he share the car with someone who could have fixed it before it got into this shape...?" I guess that is the way of the world. And then there is the third type of guy, like the ones who purchased some of the cars recently shown, who will take on the job of restoring the car(s). Please pray for all of us, as there is no "right" answer.
Barry M. Wheeler #2189

1979 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham
1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville
2016 Cadillac ATS

Offline lexi

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2017, 09:18:56 AM »
I think Barry will breathe a sigh of relief that there are many reasons why people 'collect' anything; though Jame's subject line contained the word "hoarders" which I think aptly applies to some of these individuals. Clay/Lexi

Offline TJ Hopland

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2017, 09:47:52 AM »
One could assume that at the time if these people didn't end up with them that they would have been crushed so in a way maybe they were better off?   

I can see having a few cars and really thinking that someday you will be able to do something when them but when you see dozens or more you do wonder what the mindset is and why they often don't consider selling especially when they see that the storage conditions are far from ideal.   
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Offline Steve Passmore

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2017, 10:17:20 AM »
Two main problems with 'Hoarders' is one they just don't want to sell, and the two is they always think it's worth more than it actually is, so it sits there.
Steve

Offline wrench

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2017, 10:18:02 AM »
Ha, as a person who should have a 'Caution: I brake for rust buckets' bumper sticker, I can describe these folks as 'coots'.

Many occasions I stop along a public thoroughfare and check out vehicles. I love when i get a close look at some POS and the guy yells out, 'It's not for sale"...And I say "I'm not interested in buying it!" while muttering under my breath "What a POS" to myself.

What I find even more amazing, are the rusty buckets that actually have For Sale signs on them.

People who think their pile of junk is actually worth something and try to market it, are worse mental cases than people who think their car is worth something and withhold it from the market...

The whole rusty, torn upholstery, stuck engine, flat tire, ran when parked, barn find! thing is a joke.

Sometimes I think my stopping to check them out is some sort of archeological instinct, or more probably a psychoanalytical one...
« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 10:24:37 AM by wrench »
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Offline Barry M Wheeler #2189

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2017, 10:41:41 AM »
The main problem is that all of us, repeat "all of us" want all of them. No matter that we cannot possibly live long enough to take care of them, fix them, paint them, etc, in our heart of hearts we resent the fact that you have your car and not us. "MINE" is our byword, and "I want them all" is what we think each time before we fall asleep each night. And blessed is the man whose wife understands this fact!
Barry M. Wheeler #2189

1979 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham
1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville
2016 Cadillac ATS

Offline Steve Passmore

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2017, 10:47:51 AM »
You have it in a 'nutshell ;D' barry
Steve

Offline V63

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2017, 11:02:16 AM »
Another perspective?...

Much of ‘collector’ anything would not be around today if it were not for some degree of  ‘hoarding’. These folks saved it when it was absolute worthless junk to everyone else. They saw or felt something about it at its earliest. Are they doing it for the money or the passion?

In automobiles, production numbers were always a factor...it is soon becoming  ‘how many are left?’

The Eldorado brougham town car mentioned never had an intended drive train and was really a junk ‘prop’ for years.


Offline J. Skelly

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2017, 12:25:46 PM »
I remember going to a GM dealer in the late '70s or early '80s that I heard had a lot of old cars.  In the back of the dealership was a '53 Eldorado.  This car looked like it had been pulled from a junkyard.  The interior was barely there, the top was missing, and it was thoroughly rusted out.  Some employee told me the owner wanted $5500, as I recall.  It was, to say the least, a ridiculous amount of money at the time.  While I was talking to the owner out in the parking lot a short time later that day, he suddenly started cussing.  An employee had  just backed into a quarter panel of the car.  He grumbled about what a good car it was to restore.  I didn't see any other old cars around.  Then, a decade or so later, I heard there was an auction.  He owned a decrepit, multi-story parking structure downtown, and a junkyard.  He had stored many cars in the parking structure.  Almost all of them were only suitable for parts.  At least they were saved from scrap at the time, but considering the property taxes on the parking structure, and the further deterioration of the cars, it wasn't a wise use of his money.         
Jim Skelly, CLC #15958
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Offline 76eldo

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2017, 01:03:58 PM »
I can identify with the "Gonna get to it someday" mindset.  I bought a 1985 Eldorado convertible in 1990 from friends that bought it new.  Back then my wife's daily driver was a 1984 Eldo.  Both were cosmetically beautiful and as ignorance can sometimes be bliss, I knew about using the GM pellets but never realized how lucky we were to be driving these cars for several years with no trouble at all.

So... I started a business in 1988 and was driving the 85 Eldo less and less.  The paint was starting to crack as GM factory red often did on 80's cars and the Eldo was basically parked out next to my garage.  I started and drove it often and one day while putting the top down I heard a POP and the back window shattered.  So now the car was parked next to my garage with a plastic tarp on it.  It went downhill in condition over the next few years.  Finally I rented a second garage for some of my other cars and business supplies.  The paint, top, interior, and chrome are in rough shape but yet, it's site in paid storage, at least indoors, for who knows why.

So I can see how a lot of the guys that have a bunch of cars laying around get to be hoarders.

Brian
Brian Rachlin
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1960 62 Series convert with factory Tri Power
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Offline Barry M Wheeler #2189

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2017, 02:01:38 PM »
I'm still haunting Craigslist and in Des Plaines, there is a decent appearing 1994 SDV: Grey with a darker roof that needs a starter for $700. Went to Rock Auto and the starters ranged from $40-$80 dollars roughly. Then I went to "How to change your starter" and so on. Should be able to get the car for $500 and if Glenn and I took our tools out there some day before the snow flies...

"But Honey, I've always wanted one of those!!!"

Barry M. Wheeler #2189

1979 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham
1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville
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Offline Jeepers Creepers

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2017, 02:23:27 PM »
Here in Oz, about 20 years ago now, i was trying to buy a 63 Pontiac.

It had been in the shed for a while, tyres flat, covered in dust and crap, but worth sorting out and getting a new lease on life.

"Oh No, I could never sell that car..... blah blah blah, but then he dropped this line. "That car is very dear to my heart, I could never sell it."

By now, I was over it, as this was about the 4th or 5th attempt to entice it off him and I dropped this line on him.

"If the car is so dear to your heart, why is it sitting, covered in crap, unloved and deteriorating as we speak?"

For that, he had no answer, he just gave a big hhhmmmmfffff noise.

Now keep in mind, the car back then was maybe worth $5,000 tops in the condition it was in.

So I just turned, and said..... "Oh Well, that's a shame, I would've gone $10,000 to buy it"

He chased me all the way to my car, nearly begging me to buy it...... the greedy ol turd.

In most cases, it will nearly always come down the elusive dollar and no-ones gunna rip me off scenario.
Kevin and Astrid Campbell
Australia
1964 Fleetwood Sixty Special.

Offline lexi

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2017, 02:30:47 PM »
Yes the difference between hoarding and collecting can occasionally be a fine line. I can also see how one can park a project car and just not get to it. Life can get in the way. I once knew a "Cadillac nut" who owned about 700 cars, (mostly Caddies), in various shape, (though mostly parts cars). He had them all over the place. Started a business, but he treated most of his collection like a hoarder would. When he died the Feds seized his assets for back taxes. By that time there were perhaps 200 - 300 cars left. A salvage yard bought the stash and with the exception of a half a dozen or so, the rest were scrapped. Very sad. Cars take up valuable space and also pose ecological concerns (or so we are told), so they were all crushed. Worst part was when the owner of the yard came back from vacation I could no longer cut any deals to get parts or save a couple of the cars. He just wanted them gone! Because of their size and fragile nature, automobiles are not as likely to be kept in perpetuity like a 'pez' collection! For those wishing to sell there is also what we in the Mid Century Cadillac Forum call the "Cadillac Curse". Often I see an old wrecked car for sale and because it is a Cadillac the seller thinks he has an uncut "Hope Diamond" on the market. This results in a ridiculous asking price, hence there are no takers. Then the car continues to sit and deteriorate both in condition and value. Clay/LExi

Offline 76Caddy

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2017, 03:44:02 PM »
I too was a collector (hoarder) until several years ago when I realized I would never get around to fixing all my "toys" so I sold everything but my '69 Chevrolet pickup my grandfather bought new, my '67 Eldorado and my '76 Fleetwood as these 3 meant the most to me.  I hated to part with the '55 Series 62 and the '57 Series 75 limo (with glass division) the most but they needed alot of TLC and I did not want them to set and then not be worth anything to anyone.  There comes a time when you have to let go for the sake of the car.

PS: I did break down last year and bought a '76 Seville (it followed me home).  The wife says no more unless I liquidate again.
Tim Plummer
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Offline gkhashem

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2017, 04:16:41 PM »
Here in Oz, about 20 years ago now, i was trying to buy a 63 Pontiac.

It had been in the shed for a while, tyres flat, covered in dust and crap, but worth sorting out and getting a new lease on life.

"Oh No, I could never sell that car..... blah blah blah, but then he dropped this line. "That car is very dear to my heart, I could never sell it."

By now, I was over it, as this was about the 4th or 5th attempt to entice it off him and I dropped this line on him.

"If the car is so dear to your heart, why is it sitting, covered in crap, unloved and deteriorating as we speak?"

For that, he had no answer, he just gave a big hhhmmmmfffff noise.

Now keep in mind, the car back then was maybe worth $5,000 tops in the condition it was in.

So I just turned, and said..... "Oh Well, that's a shame, I would've gone $10,000 to buy it"

He chased me all the way to my car, nearly begging me to buy it...... the greedy ol turd.

In most cases, it will nearly always come down the elusive dollar and no-ones gunna rip me off scenario.


I think your on to something.   :)
1959 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1964 Oldsmobile 98 Town Sedan
1966 Cadillac Coupe Deville (Senior #861)
1970 GMC C/K 1500
1978 Cadillac Coupe Deville (Senior Crown #959)
1984 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Royal Brougham Coupe
1989 Buick Reatta
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Offline bcroe

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hoarders of cars
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2017, 05:45:26 PM »
There are "only" six cars here, but a requirement when I moved was
that they would all be parked on indoor concrete.  Apparently diesel
cars are important, 3 of them originally were diesel.  Fabulous cruisers
once a super duty engine/trans is bolted in, and no inspections.  These
are not exactly waiting for a chance to be driven; the AVERAGE mileage
is approaching 300,000.  Bruce Roe

Offline Jeepers Creepers

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2017, 12:23:15 AM »
As follow on from my previous post, I never went back, but I was told years later, it was moved outside and covered with a tarp.
Many years later after that,  after the owner had carked it, the tarp was taken off for it to be sold and it was just rooted.

The roof was peppered with rust holes, the floors were shot.... it ended its life as a parts car.

The silly thing is, i did still end up with a 63 Pontiac, had it for several years, it was even used for our wedding.

Just a shame, something that can be saved, can't be.
Kevin and Astrid Campbell
Australia
1964 Fleetwood Sixty Special.

Offline James Landi

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2017, 09:38:06 AM »
There are "only" six cars here, but a requirement when I moved was
that they would all be parked on indoor concrete.  Apparently diesel
cars are important, 3 of them originally were diesel.  Fabulous cruisers
once a super duty engine/trans is bolted in, and no inspections.  These
are not exactly waiting for a chance to be driven; the AVERAGE mileage
is approaching 300,000.  Bruce Roe
Bruce, I think in this regard, we share some "values" in common with you.  I sold my 23,000 mile '85 Eldo Convertible on Ebay in 2007, for an outrageous price instigated by a bidding war among several affectionados, and then picked up a similar convertible with 106k miles from a CLC member that was in showing its age, but I kept it going with 2 used 4100 engine and finally a transplant small block Oldsmobile 2013...and very recently  sold it to a CLC member who is enjoying it.  My philosophy--- if I can keep them going and have them pass the 15 foot test, then I'm very happy... Now with my low mileage 2007 XLR I just purchased, I'm suffering from a nervous breakdown every time I use this fabulous car. NOt sure how to reconcile my using this beautiful piece automotive design and technology... I think I'm needing a "shrink!"

Offline 59-in-pieces

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Re: hoarders of cars
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2017, 11:37:26 AM »
James,
You and I have a very different approach to our XLR's - as we have texted each other.
The car is not a Faberge egg that is so dainty and should sit it behind glass to be admired.
The XLR is much like the egg, but to be admired - not behind glass - but with the top down and your foot to the floor.
It is a sports car with with an hellishly powerful engine, which should be driven - but not like Miss Daisy was in the back seat - if it had one.
Perhaps I hoard it, don't drive it as a daily driver, but when I want it, it's there to enjoy - even though it sits outside and has a foot of ash from the Cali. fires of late.

To get back to the topic, likes change over time, and we maybe moved from GI Joes, or comic books which end up in drawers, basements, or attics - and those we would not think of selling, but maybe it's just a storage issue - out of sight, out of mind.
Some of my cars I have not driven in an age (this is Cali, not a snow thing), but would not think of selling a one.
I only need walk by - catch a glimpse - and all the favorite memories wash back - and I'm happy.

Now to close the loop - so when the XLR takes its place among the other dusty cars, I will remember back of the fun times of racing around the town and freeways (interstates).

Have fun,
Steve B.
S. Butcher