Author Topic: Automobile Commercials on TV.  (Read 504 times)

Offline e.mason

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Automobile Commercials on TV.
« on: January 10, 2018, 06:59:21 PM »
Just curious as to how others feel about the current offering of Automobile Commercials on TV.  It seems to me that all the manufacturers are going more for image then tauting the advantages of their products.  I guess that their marketing agencies feel as though the current trend in making commercials is the way to go.  I prefer the commercials of the past, when the advantages and improvements in the models were the order of the day.  Here are a couple of samples of commercials of the past.  I especially remember when Jack Lescoulie did the Buick Commericals.  It was like he was delivering the Gettysburg Address.  He really made you want to run right out and buy a Buick.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4Khi7rtnbM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMAddpU6EPA

Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 07:52:04 PM »
I haven't seen many late and current car commercials for USA, but with the cost of advertising these days, what I have seen, even down here doesn't encourage me to buy a new car.

The old adverts really make one want to go and buy, but the modern ones but nowadays everything is "arty-farty", flashy and just too "over-the-top".   The Directors are more about showing off how "smart" they can be, than to simply show us what they have to promote.

Even advertising down here is showing stuff that is using overseas-made advertising, with a small disclaimer that the shown model in not available here.   The advertisers really don't think much of the people that they are trying to sell to.

Bruce. >:D

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Offline Jay Friedman

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 06:37:47 AM »
What amuses me most about car ads on TV is the cars shown never seem to be in traffic and there is always a parking space for them. 
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Offline Tpicks55

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 08:17:22 AM »
I think the one car advertisement I like  is the Subaru as it tells you you can survive an accident in their car.  That's paramount for someone to think about.  The others advertise lame topics as I perceive its hard to tell one car from the others they all look alike. 
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Offline Big Apple Caddy

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 08:19:35 AM »
As the Internet provides convenient access to so much detailed information including specs, images, videos, commentary, etc, there is less need to talk about specific improvements or advantages in commercial these days compared to times past when accessing information wasn't as quick and easy and lengthy 2-3 minute commercials were more necessary.

As far as the appeal of or preference for older commercials, I think for some it's simply that the commercials bring them back to their youth or younger years and the cars they admired back then.

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 08:21:50 AM »
The others advertise lame topics as I perceive its hard to tell one car from the others they all look alike.

People have been commenting and complaining about cars looking alike for decades and decades, including back in the 1950s.

Offline e.mason

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 08:43:27 AM »
As the Internet provides convenient access to so much detailed information including specs, images, videos, commentary, etc, there is less need to talk about specific improvements or advantages in commercial these days compared to times past when accessing information wasn't as quick and easy and lengthy 2-3 minute commercials were more necessary.

As far as the appeal of or preference for older commercials, I think for some it's simply that the commercials bring them back to their youth or younger years and the cars they admired back then.

Both interesting points.

Yes the Internet does provide more then enough information about an automobile or automobiles a prospective buyer would need.  By using the Internet, a buyer can literally "build" the car of their choice and then be guided to a dealer who would have the car in inventory.  Basically the car buying experience could be whittled down to a buyer going to show room.  Actually see and sit in the vehicle of their choice, and then start the negotiating.  Unlike in the past.  When it was necessary to go to the showroom and start the whole process from scratch.  But here is the thing.  Putting aside brand loyalty for a moment.  The manufacturers need a hook to get buyers in the showroom.  This is where advertising comes in.  The obvious purpose of commercials is to spark interest in a manufacturers product. They want to project a "must have" thinking for their product.

My preference for the older type of commercials, is because I want to know what a vehicle has to offer me.  In other words, I prefer function over form.

Offline Bob Schuman

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 09:27:15 AM »
Many current car commercials on TV show the car or cars being driven very aggressively and sliding sideways around corners. I want my vehicle to  "stick to the road" and not slide around like on ice, so those commercials do not impress me. I know cars can be driven like they show, and may have tried it in my distant youth, but I'm afraid the modern commercials may encourage young drivers to try to emulate what they see, with undesirable results.
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Offline 59-in-pieces

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 10:02:46 AM »
The commercials it seems are appealing to the youth culture - image - power - motion - action, and going places - fast (who wouldn't want that for a life style - and YOU THE DRIVER are the ambassador of the - look-at-me generation)
The commercial images are views from outside the car because, it shows what YOU could look like driving this car.
The exceptions are often quick shots of an electronic dash board - clean and a sign of the MODERN electronic age, of which YOU are a big part.

Frankly, those folks who grew up with our 3 sons and their friends have leased cars (new I might add) did not take a test drive.  It was totally unnecessary as they knew what they wanted from what they saw driving the streets - only reinforced by the commercials selling their life style - or at least the one they wanted to project. 

And after all, the short term lease has pushed aside buying, and if I don't like the car in a couple years - image changes and it will be time for new clothes = a NEW car.

Have fun,
Steve B
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Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 04:38:08 PM »
Actually, I have to laugh at the makers for showing their vehicles (SUV's and off-roaders) going through all manner of obstacles, when 99.9% of them will never leave the sealed surfaces.

Bruce. >:D
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Offline 59-in-pieces

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2018, 11:25:37 AM »
True DAT - Bruce.
Have fun,
Steve B
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Offline "Cadillac Kid" Greg Surfas 15364

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2018, 12:16:49 PM »
Just to add my $.02 worth to this conversation regarding cars looking "all alike".  When I first met my wife (she is MUCH better now), she would see an older car, anything from the 30's to the 70's and tell me. within a year or two, what year the car was.  I would ask her what make of car it was and she would not have a clue.  So, the comment about all cars looking alike is and definitely was always a factor in automobiles.
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Offline z3skybolt

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2018, 04:27:07 PM »
As a kid of the 50s and 60s...

.....I could identify every make model and year from the post war period up through the 70s.  And yes many of them did look alike. A Chrysler/Desoto/Dodge, even the Plymouth appeared to be very similar.  Say the same for the GM and Ford cars.  I cannot look at a 49 Cadillac Sedanette without seeing my brother-in-law's 49 Chevy Fleetline.. The independent auto manufacturers...Hudson, Studebaker, Nash, Kaiser/Fraizer, Packard, had distinct body styles from one another and were never confused.

When comparing the styles of the big three..... certainly Ford products didn't look like GM products and neither looked like Chrysler.  But within each corporation there was a lot of inbreeding. 

Having a such a smaller number of different automobiles back then, made identifying them easier. Imperial, Chrysler, Desoto, Dodge, Plymouth.  Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Chevy.  Lincoln, Mercury, Ford.  Very, very, few foreign cars on American roads, until the Beetle caught on in the 60s.  And that one looked like nothing else!!,

Now there are dozens of car companies and I do think they look alike.  I can hardly tell a Mercedes from a Lexus, BMW, Honda or KIA.  A few years ago no one would have mistaken an inexpensive KIA for a Mercedes.  Mow...I guess wrong about 70% of the time,

Old cars rule.

Bob

« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 04:33:45 PM by z3skybolt »
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Offline e.mason

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2018, 07:56:44 PM »
As a kid of the 50s and 60s...

.....I could identify every make model and year from the post war period up through the 70s.  And yes many of them did look alike. A Chrysler/Desoto/Dodge, even the Plymouth appeared to be very similar.  Say the same for the GM and Ford cars.  I cannot look at a 49 Cadillac Sedanette without seeing my brother-in-law's 49 Chevy Fleetline.. The independent auto manufacturers...Hudson, Studebaker, Nash, Kaiser/Fraizer, Packard, had distinct body styles from one another and were never confused.

When comparing the styles of the big three..... certainly Ford products didn't look like GM products and neither looked like Chrysler.  But within each corporation there was a lot of inbreeding. 

Having a such a smaller number of different automobiles back then, made identifying them easier. Imperial, Chrysler, Desoto, Dodge, Plymouth.  Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Chevy.  Lincoln, Mercury, Ford.  Very, very, few foreign cars on American roads, until the Beetle caught on in the 60s.  And that one looked like nothing else!!,

Now there are dozens of car companies and I do think they look alike.  I can hardly tell a Mercedes from a Lexus, BMW, Honda or KIA.  A few years ago no one would have mistaken an inexpensive KIA for a Mercedes.  Mow...I guess wrong about 70% of the time,

Old cars rule.

Bob

Granted that most cars today, do resemble each other.  This has been the order of the day for quite a few decades now.  I might add that Cadillac has confused the situation even more, by doing away with names for their models and replacing with letters and number.  I suppose to many younger buyers, say under 45, looks and style don't count for that much when deciding what car to buy.  The adds don't include phrases like "bold new styling" etc. in their ads.  As been stated before.  It all appears to be about image.

Offline z3skybolt

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2018, 09:19:38 PM »
Yes,

When my youngest son graduated from Law School he bought his first new car.  A pain jane entry level Toyota.  His older brother scoffed..."You aren't going to get any girls driving that thing".  The youngster smirked...."I got a girlfriend...I just wanted reliable transportation."

Never could get that kid interested in cars.... even now. Five years later he still drives the Toyota, Which he paid for in one year. When he was 16 we offered to buy him a nice Jeep CJ.  Nope dad...I just want mom's plain 7 year old Cherokee.

Not like his old man.

Bob
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Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 05:18:04 AM »
From what I notice more than ever before in the majority of car commercials I've seen in the last 5-10 years, is that the auto manufacturers all focus on MPG's, tech features, safety features/crash ratings and tout handling more than anything else.

Very rarely do you see a commercial these days that mention the vehicles "cool" styling, or any sort of reference to the design of the car, even in the luxury car commercials, you might see something related to it's performance, but never about its interesting lines, or quality of materials, nothing that actually has to do with the feel of the vehicle.

It's more about how you can get into a BMW 5 series with a great lease deal! Or how amazing the new Toyota Camry is because you now see young people jamming away or racing around on a race track.  ???

Subaru and Volvo in all their commercials really focus their Ad's heavily on emotion, to get people to believe that if you buy a Subie, or a Volvo, somehow you're smarter and more intelligent than the person that just bought a Ford Fusion. It's honestly ridiculous marketing tactics that obviously works since the buying public is being sucked into believing this hype.

Women are mostly duped by this trick, it doesn't work as well on Men. However, Women buy more vehicles than Men and are easily manipulated by over the top emotionally charged advertising.

I'm not old,  nor did I grow up in the 50's, 60's or 70's, but I have to agree with some here that I love and enjoy watching old vintage car commercials from the past on Youtube.

The days when car company commercials actually compared it's cars to it's competitors were awesome and very informative. Chrysler did this a lot with it's Imperials touting how much physically bigger a 65 Imperial is to a 65 Cadillac and Lincoln, how much more interior space it had etc....

We don't see these kinds of comparison anymore, nor do we see the kind of interesting and artful Ad's in magazines like you did years ago either.

I believe since modern cars look extremely similar to one another more than ever before, auto makers marketing departments aren't talking about how unique a Hyundai Sonata is compared to a Honda Accord, or a Chevy Malibu, or a Ford Fusion because generally, they all share the same body shapes, same proportions, and even drivetrains, that honestly, the difference between cars these days is price and interior design.

There's no mistaking an 85 Cadillac Brougham for an 85 Lincoln Town Car, the proportions are completely different as is the front grills and rear end treatment. The Lincoln being more boxy, upright, and square, while the Caddy , more angular, rounded off and long.

Speaking of newish cars, I just went to a car show here where I live at the convention center, and I was able to sit in just about every brand spanking new vehicle you could think of.


To my surprise and disappointment, new car interiors might look nice with all that fake stiching, but the actual materials are extremely cheap!! The Toyota Camry and Honda Accord being pretty bad, the door panels felt flimsy as did the center armrest and switches.

Cadillacs, like XT5 had a pretty good interior, but not what you expect for the price. Lexus, Audi, and Mercedes had the best quality interiors compared to everything on the showroom floor.

I test drove a few cars too, the new 2018 Chrysler 300 and Charger was very smooth riding, but it's interior was plain, and cheap feeling like all Dodge and Chrysler products. I was shocked in every sense of the way when I test drove a Mazda CX9 CUV. It had a beautiful striking interior that belonged in a luxury car, everything was padded and nicely textured. Its ride was really really smooth for a CUV and it looks stunning. A very futuristic CUV IMO with a great quality interior, high-end tech, a smooth ride and interior space that could house a football team!

Mazda is probably the only non-luxury automaker out there that is making luxury like interiors that is stylish and distinctive vs everyone else in its market including it's overall designs.

I still prefer the classic Cadillacs hands down to anything made today. Give me chrome galore, massive couch like seats, a big hood and trunk, Caddy Wreath n Crest on the hood, that cool n classy Cadillac styling, in a pillarless hardtop Deville with that smooth Caddy ride. 8) 8) :) Absolutely nothing at that car show could compare, not one to my 64.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 05:22:22 AM by 64CaddieLacky »
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Offline D.Smith

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 06:51:57 AM »
 Cadillac "Roll" Commercial

https://youtu.be/dWH16fb0Pys
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 11:20:33 AM by D.Smith »

Offline e.mason

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 08:59:47 AM »

Mazda is probably the only non-luxury automaker out there that is making luxury like interiors that is stylish and distinctive vs everyone else in its market including it's overall designs.



Which begs the question. What qualifies a car to be a "luxury" car"?  When in the presence of other car guys, I frequently ask this question to get a conversation going.  Used to be a time when the answer was obvious.  Cadillac, Lincoln, Imperial etc. defined luxury cars.  Why?  Usually it was their size, comfort and amenities i.e. power windows, power brakes, power steering etc.  Today most plain Jane, entry level cars would put luxury cars of the past to shame, with what the newer cars offer as standard.  Remember when A/C was a high priced option?  So how do we define luxury today.  Price?  options?  Wouldn't the Mazda CX-9 qualify as a luxury model?  Its their top of the line, and the most expensive model.  How about a top of the line Chevy Tahoe, coming in at 65K+?

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2018, 10:18:36 AM »
Which begs the question. What qualifies a car to be a "luxury" car"?  When in the presence of other car guys, I frequently ask this question to get a conversation going.  Used to be a time when the answer was obvious.  Cadillac, Lincoln, Imperial etc. defined luxury cars.  Why?  Usually it was their size, comfort and amenities i.e. power windows, power brakes, power steering etc.  Today most plain Jane, entry level cars would put luxury cars of the past to shame, with what the newer cars offer as standard.  Remember when A/C was a high priced option?  So how do we define luxury today.  Price?  options?  Wouldn't the Mazda CX-9 qualify as a luxury model?  Its their top of the line, and the most expensive model.  How about a top of the line Chevy Tahoe, coming in at 65K+?



The lines are heavily being blurred as the years pass by in my experience, my 17 Impala feels like a borderline luxury car, and I still think to this day that it is one of the most underrated, undervalued, yet one of the most over achieving, well put together cars in the market. GM did extremely well with its Epsilon II platform and the 3.6 V6 engine paired to  itís 6 speed trans which is a match made in heaven.

Where luxury cars actually stand out these days vs 50 years ago, is mostly in high end advanced tech, not necessarily based on its size or even performance because a lot of non luxury cars are just as powerful as a mommy  commuter mobile.

Attention to detail, solidarity of the body structure, heavy curb weight, high quality materials from seat quality to window switches and button heft all are part of what makes a real luxury car today.

So some things are the same in that sense, like build quality, but thereís an increasingly diverse amounts of ways now that luxury automakers are forced to do in order to justify the asking price for what theyíre making because so many non luxury cars these days also  have very nice interiors, are well equipped with the latest  safety and tech features, are quiet to drive, and are reliable.


Itís not the 50ís and 60ís anymore when Cadillac pretty much sold cars by the truck load based off their massive size, road presence, great styling attributes, quality of materials, power accessories, engine performance, spacious  interior room and surpreme riding comfort and itís prestige..

It was really a simple formula that worked for years for the brand, but like every great giant, they eventually fall from grace and lose their ways.

I still believe a very high quality interior, high end advanced tech, and styling is what makes all the difference in the world. So the top of the line Chevy Tahoe  can be luxurious, but to what extent?  It might have all the tech features thatís in a Escalade, but the door panels have cheap hard plastic on them or the seats leather feels less plush and thick compared to an Escalade.

For the Escalade youíre mostly paying for its size and styling, as itís considered the Fleetwood Brougham of our era, rather for the interior quality per say since a $75,000 equipped Hyundai G90 has better quality door panels than an Escalade and thatís pretty shocking considering how damn expensive an Escalade is.

I will agree tho, it is getting very hard to justify moving up to something more pricey.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 10:30:34 AM by 64CaddieLacky »
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Offline e.mason

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Re: Automobile Commercials on TV.
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2018, 10:51:21 AM »

I still believe a very high quality interior, high end advanced tech, and styling is what makes all the difference in the world. So the top of the line Chevy Tahoe  can be luxurious, but to what extent?  It might have all the tech features thatís in a Escalade, but the door panels have cheap hard plastic on them or the seats leather feels less plush and thick compared to an Escalade.

For the Escalade youíre mostly paying for its size and styling, as itís considered the Fleetwood Brougham of our era, rather for the interior quality per say since a $75,000 equipped Hyundai G90 has better quality door panels than an Escalade and thatís pretty shocking considering how damn expensive an Escalade is.

I will agree tho, it is getting very hard to justify moving up to something more pricey.

Lets bring the GMC Yukon Denali into the conversation.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/automobiles/cadillac-escalade-vs-gmc-yukon-denali-buy-this-not-that.html/?a=viewall