Author Topic: Looking to the future of classic cars.  (Read 3076 times)

Offline Big Apple Caddy

  • Posts: 658
  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #100 on: November 29, 2017, 07:44:38 AM »
He forgot to add that adding to the look alike styling, was that all the cars had 4 tires, bumpers and gas filler. Auto sales down in 1958 because they lost their prestige?  Really?  I think not.  this was a time when ever teenager in the country wanted a car of one type or another.  The author failed to mention that the country was in a recession in 1958.

This individual's OPINION (all of these "look alike" comments are really just opinions, afterall) in 1958 was that "almost all cars look alike."   An opinion held by others that year, that decade and every other decade.  Some others back then agreed with the “look alike” comment, and some others no doubt didn't.  Just like opinions people have today about today’s cars.  This debate has been around for ages and one never "resolved" given the subjectivity.

Offline e.mason

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  • Name: Eric Mason
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #101 on: November 29, 2017, 08:56:35 AM »
This individual's OPINION (all of these "look alike" comments are really just opinions, afterall) in 1958 was that "almost all cars look alike."   An opinion held by others that year, that decade and every other decade.  Some others back then agreed with the “look alike” comment, and some others no doubt didn't.  Just like opinions people have today about today’s cars.  This debate has been around for ages and one never "resolved" given the subjectivity.

Opinions are just that. Opinions.  Nothing more and not to be taken as fact.

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #102 on: November 29, 2017, 06:26:10 PM »
Opinions are just that. Opinions.  Nothing more and not to be taken as fact.

Yes, as I have stated several times.

Opinions that modern cars of whatever given year/decade look too much alike have been around for ages and are not new or unique to today just as they weren’t new or unique to the 1950s, 60s or whatever.

Offline 64CaddieLacky

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  • Name: C.Asaro
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #103 on: November 29, 2017, 10:06:22 PM »
Well then what decade does everyone think Cadillacs looked the “BEST”? This should put an end to the argument.
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #104 on: November 29, 2017, 10:26:03 PM »
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so this is an unfair question.

Bruce. >:D
'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Offline 64CaddieLacky

  • Posts: 248
  • Name: C.Asaro
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #105 on: November 30, 2017, 01:29:07 AM »
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so this is an unfair question.

Bruce. >:D

We definitely need a poll then.  :D

Most favorite decade of Cadillacs?

Personally I pick 50’s-60’s. 8)
1964 Sedan Deville
1994 Fleetwood Bro
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental

Offline e.mason

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  • Name: Eric Mason
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #106 on: November 30, 2017, 08:36:09 AM »
We definitely need a poll then.  :D

Most favorite decade of Cadillacs?

Personally I pick 50’s-60’s. 8)

I would say the 50's was the break out decade for Cadillac and GM.  Some consider the 50's the golden age of automobiles.  Like Elvis, the 59's are one of the most famous icons of the 50's.

Offline e.mason

  • Posts: 60
  • Name: Eric Mason
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #107 on: November 30, 2017, 08:39:00 AM »
Yes, as I have stated several times.

Opinions that modern cars of whatever given year/decade look too much alike have been around for ages and are not new or unique to today just as they weren’t new or unique to the 1950s, 60s or whatever.

If one is easily able to tell you what make and year a car is, how can it be said that cars of that era, all look alike?

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #108 on: November 30, 2017, 10:32:20 AM »
If one is easily able to tell you what make and year a car is, how can it be said that cars of that era, all look alike?

This is so obviously because not everyone can or could at the time "easily tell what make and model a car is" which is why they would say "all cars look alike."  You seem to think that if you or any one person can/could easily tell makes and models of cars apart from certain years or decades then EVERYONE else can/could as well but that's simply not the case.

"Look alike" opinions about modern cars of the time were around in the 1910s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, etc.  These opinions are not new or unique to today just as opposite opinions (i.e. cars don't all look alike) have been around for decades too and yes, these opposing opinions can now exist and did in the past exist simultaneously.

Offline e.mason

  • Posts: 60
  • Name: Eric Mason
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #109 on: November 30, 2017, 11:49:52 AM »
This is so obviously because not everyone can or could at the time "easily tell what make and model a car is" which is why they would say "all cars look alike."  You seem to think that if you or any one person can/could easily tell makes and models of cars apart from certain years or decades then EVERYONE else can/could as well but that's simply not the case.

"Look alike" opinions about modern cars of the time were around in the 1910s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, etc.  These opinions are not new or unique to today just as opposite opinions (i.e. cars don't all look alike) have been around for decades too and yes, these opposing opinions can now exist and did in the past exist simultaneously.


Would agree that in the infancy of the automobile, 1900's -1930's, cars did "look alike"  In 1927 along came Harley Earl, who designed the 1927 LaSalle.  The rest is history, as manufacturers focused on styling, to take away the sameness of appearance.  I would concede that in all probability many individuals have never been concerned with make, model and year of cars.  In my childhood, all the boys I hung around with, always knew the make and year of all cars in the 50's.  We used to make annual pilgrimages to the local automobile dealerships, to see the new models up close and personal.  We would point out to each other the differences of the new models to the preceding years.


Offline gary griffin

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Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #110 on: November 30, 2017, 04:06:47 PM »
And we are om the way to all cars looking alike again.  I saw a TV discussion about this over 20 years ago. A Ford engineer  used the Continental trunk hump as an example. Removing that improved gas mileage so it had to go. All cars are designed on the computer using wind tunnel calculations to figure the best profile. Not much fun to watch many colors of almost identical SUV's going down the road, with only the badges showing the brand.
Gary Griffin

1940 LaSalle 5029 4 door convertible sedan
1942 Cadillac 6719 restoration almost complete?
1942 Cadillac 6719 (parts car) (Gone)
1957 Cadillac 60-special (Needs a little TLC)

Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #111 on: November 30, 2017, 04:46:23 PM »
The next problem is that to see what the badges are, in a lot of cases, one has to be up that close to differentiate between them that one could get accused of something immoral.

Plus, the companies are always changing their badge design.   Even Cadillac messed up with theirs.   Everything has to be "Futuristic" for some reason.

Bruce. >:D
'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Looking to the future of classic cars.
« Reply #112 on: November 30, 2017, 07:04:15 PM »
Would agree that in the infancy of the automobile, 1900's -1930's, cars did "look alike"  In 1927 along came Harley Earl, who designed the 1927 LaSalle.  The rest is history, as manufacturers focused on styling, to take away the sameness of appearance.  I would concede that in all probability many individuals have never been concerned with make, model and year of cars.  In my childhood, all the boys I hung around with, always knew the make and year of all cars in the 50's.  We used to make annual pilgrimages to the local automobile dealerships, to see the new models up close and personal.  We would point out to each other the differences of the new models to the preceding years.

Sure and when you were a kid admiring the new 1950s models, members of classic car clubs were blasting same as being look alike, lacking originality, etc and were instead praising cars from decades before for their individual design, being from the golden age of autos, etc including the very same decades of cars you just labeled here as "look alike."  For example, see “Fast Growing Club of Ancient Auto Owners Look on New Cars With Disdain" article I posted on page 2 of this topic.

These types of "competing" opinions have been repeated with each passing generation and again and again, decade after decade, opinions exist that cars look alike.  It's nothing new or unique to today, ten years ago, twenty years ago or any particular decade.