Author Topic: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.  (Read 4415 times)

help please

  • Guest
old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« on: January 21, 2009, 08:51:55 AM »
Hi.Could somebody please tell me where I may find an instruction manual or know how so I may help my dad put new tires on old split rims from the early 30's.He says he remembers a tool or so he thinks that used to sqeeze the rim and and the rim would overlap itself.Thank-you.

Offline Otto Skorzeny

  • Posts: 3853
  • 1956 Coupe de Ville aka Bismarck
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2009, 08:59:04 AM »
Unless you are experienced in mounting and demounting split rim tires, I would suggest you find a professional shop to take your tires to. Doing it improperly or without ALL the correct equipment can result in your DEATH!

I'm not exaggerating.

If you live near a Coker Tire store or similar seller/installer of vintage tires, take it to them. If not, find shop that will work with split rims. You'll probably have to go to a shop that works on over-the-road trucks to find someone with the skill and equipment required to deal with split rims.

Let me just say this: The fact that you're asking for instructions and advice on how to deal with split rims, tells me that you have no business attempting this yourself. I'm not trying to offend you or put you down, I'm just telling it like it is. Split rims have killed and maimed many a professional mechanic in their day and are not the purview of the average do-it-yourselfer.

The danger is due to the fact that a tire with a pressure of 30psi, has about 6 tons of force trying to tear the wheel apart. If the split rim is unseated, it will become a dangerous projectile.

Multi-piece wheels or rims have frequently resulted in serious injury or death to tire mounters employed in service stations and tire stores which explains why they are often referred to as “widow makers.”  Multi-piece rims are available in numerous configurations or designs, but all are potentially life threatening.

Here is a good website explaining the procedure. Take note of the special safety equipment required, e.g. metal cages, remote inflation devices, etc.
http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/garages/split_rim.html
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 10:57:28 AM by ottoskorzeny »
fward

Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for YOURSELF

HUGE VENDOR LIST CLICK HERE

Richard Pope

  • Guest
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2009, 01:22:26 PM »
I think it would help if we knew what year car you are dealing with. My 1919 Dodge has split rims, but it also has inner tubes and a liner in addition to the tire. Obvioulsy, doing this with an inflated tire is very dangerous and should not be attempted by anyone.

However, if the tube has been deflated and you have a split rim tool you can do this yourself. It is a timely process where great care must take precidence because as you inflate the tire you may run the same risk as mentioned above.There is very little 'bead' on these type of tires.

The tool (I have two) bascially has three arms that grab the rim. They are listed as 'rim splitters' or 'split rim tool' .You slowly crank one of the arms in to get the rim to separate and collapse to a smaller diameter which allows you to remove the tire, tube and liner (if needed).

If you are like me and live where no one has every seen such a tool or is aware of how to do it. You may have to do it yourself. I do agree with the above post that if you can get to Coker or any other place that is familiar with this type of mounting it would be worth your time and $$$ to have them do it. I have instructions somewhere that I could scann when I get back into town (this weekend). Send me a PM if you want this - but I would recommend getting as many of these as possible and then take the safest route possible.

Offline Mike Josephic CLC #3877

  • Posts: 1299
    • CLC Member
      CLC Member #3877
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2009, 03:25:23 PM »
The above posts urging caution are right on the money.

I worked for Gulf Oil on the PA Turnpike in the 60's and we frequently had to tear
down and fix split rim tires.  They were mainly truck tires with tubes and flaps (liners).

You need proper tools, knowledge and safety equipment to do this.

If you do not have the split rim seated correctly prior to inflation it is a very dangerous
situation.  We had a special "cage" built out of heavy guage steel pipe that we would
roll the wheel in by hand -- and inflate it only after that to pressure.  After inflating and
ensuring the rim was seated, we would wait a few minutes then remount it on the truck.

We did have a man decapitated a few years prior to my working there, which is why
every station had these special "cages" installed.  The rim separated, the tire exploded
and it killed him.  He was standing by the tire as it lay on the driveway, inflating it,
when the rim let go.

This is not a "do it yourself" project.  Take it to a pro.

Mike
1955 Cadillac Eldorado
1973 Cadillac Eldorado
1995 Cadillac Seville
2004 Escalade
CLCMRC Museum Benefactor #38

Offline "Cadillac Kid" Greg Surfas 15364

  • Posts: 1381
    • CLC Member
      CLC Member #15364
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2009, 03:28:18 PM »
I third the motion.
Greg
Cadillac Kid-Greg Surfas
CLC #15364
66 Coupe deVille (now gone to the UK)
72 Eldo Cpe
73 Coupe deVille
75 Coupe deElegance
76 Coupe deVille
514 inch motor now in '73-

Offline Otto Skorzeny

  • Posts: 3853
  • 1956 Coupe de Ville aka Bismarck
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2009, 03:51:42 PM »
My uncle was nearly killed in a similar incident in the 50s or 60s. He owned a service station and was in the garage when one of his employees (who was soon to be an ex-employee) tried to inflate a split rim tire while it was installed on a car on the lift instead of in the cage.

The rim let go and flew across the shop nearly taking off my uncle's head. The piece hit the brick wall with such force it actually knocked out bricks and lodged itself in the wall.

The idiot who was responsible had his arm broken in the incident and was, of course, fired.
fward

Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for YOURSELF

HUGE VENDOR LIST CLICK HERE

Online 76eldo

  • Posts: 2890
    • CLC Member
      CLC Member #22443
  • Name: Brian Rachlin
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2009, 09:17:59 PM »
Ditto,

I wouldn't touch one.  Take it to someone who knows exactly how to work on split rims.

Brian
Brian Rachlin
Huntingdon Valley, Pa
CLC # 22443
Current collection:
1960 62 Series Convertible
1960 Eldorado Seville
1970 DeVille Convertible
1976 Eldorado Convertible
1980 Hess & Eisenhardt Eldorado Convertible
1981 Hess & Eisenhardt Eldorado Convertible
1985 Eldorado Biarritz Convertible
1985 Eldorado Touring Coupe Convertible
1985 Seville (parts car)
1999 Eldorado Touring Coupe
2007 DTS

Offline Glen

  • Posts: 1571
    • CLC Member
      CLC Member #727
  • Name: Glen Houlton
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2009, 02:03:44 AM »
First of all define what you mean by a split rim. 

The cautions above are accurate, but from your description I suspect they are thinking of a different type of rim. 

The rim they are talking about is used a lot on trucks.  They have a ring that mounts on the main part of the rim and is held on by a large snap ring.  This ring holds the outer bead of the tire and has a lot of force on it when the tire is inflated.  These are very dangerous as the snap ring can fly off if not seated correctly.  The tires on this type of rim should always be inflated in a cage designed for that purpose. 

See these web sites for some pictures of split rims.  http://www.4wdonline.com/Wheels/Split.html
http://www.accuridewheels.com/SafetyManual/section%20IV.pdf


My local AACA club recently helped my friend change the tires on his 1932 Peerless.  The rim on the Peerless is not a solid circle but has a break in it.  Imagine the letter C with the ends butted together.   The lug wrench has a flat end opposite the socket.  This flat end is inserted into a buckle on the rim.  As the buckle is turned the rim is reduced in circumference by bringing one end of the C inside and over the other end.  Normally the tire can then be removed.  But the tires were so old we had to use a sawz all to cut the tires off. 

Once the tires were off the rims were painted.  Unfortunately I was not able to attend the meeting where we put the new tires on.   But I believe they were mounted by reversing the removal procedure. 

I dont see this type of rim as being as dangerous as the one with the separate ring because the inner and outer bead seat of the rim is connected. 

But use care. 

Glen
 


Glen Houlton CLC #727 
CLCMRC benefactor #104

Offline johnsor

  • John Sorenson CLC #24780
  • Posts: 22
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2009, 09:44:56 AM »
Glen is correct, there are different types of split rims.  If you are talking about the type that was used on a Model T Ford, and many other cars of the day, they are not real dangerous, only very frustrating if you don't have a 3-legged special tool that expands the rim.  The type of rim that uses a snap or locking ring to hold the tire on is very dangerous as pointed out above.  Normally such locking rims were used mainly on trucks, however some old heavy cars did use them also - like my 31 LaSalle.  Deflating and disassembly is not a problem, but I would never want to be near one that is being inflated unless it was done in a tire cage.  Any shop that deals in truck tires or the repair of them would have an inflating cage and the know-how to do the job safely.
John Sorenson,  31 LaSalle 345, Convertible Coupe

JohnA

  • Guest
Re: old tire mounting and dismounting off split rim.
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2009, 01:52:40 PM »
Any inflated tire assembly carries the potential for a lethal explosion.

However, the true "split-rim" -two rim halves held together by a band- are considered the most dangerous type. The band is held in tension and is relatively light and prone to rust through and deterioration of the holding area at the "C." These rims are known to spontaneously separate even after being assembled and in service. The true split-rims  are no longer manufactured, and there previously had been an all out industry effort to get them out of regular service, and replaced by the lock-ring type, multi-piece rim.

The multi-piece rims, which use  lock rings held in compression at the beads, are still in production today,  and are often erroneously called "split rims." This type of multi=piece rim is most commonly used with current production tube-type truck tires, and "O" ring sealed off-road tires. Once properly assembled and inflated, these lock-ring retained, multi-piece assemblies, are relatively safe; much more so than the true split-rims.

Regardless, it's good work practice to avoid being in line with the projectile, or bead side, of an inflated tire assembly. But that's not enough; in the event of an explosion, even if the flying parts  miss you, there's still a potential for a blinding or deafening air blast.

Tire mounting is serious business, with no room for experiments.

Good Luck

 



Cadillac & LaSalle Club Visa