Cadillac & LaSalle Club Discussion Forum

Cadillac & LaSalle Club Forums => General Discussion => Topic started by: chrisntam on April 24, 2021, 03:16:44 PM

Title: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: chrisntam on April 24, 2021, 03:16:44 PM
Cadillac is slated to end ICE (internal combustion engine) production 9 years from now.  GM (some or most models) by 2035.

Cadillac is nearing taking orders (September 2021) and releasing the Lyric for the 2023 model year.  From what I understand, it has a range of 300 miles.  You can quick charge it for 10 minutes and go another 76 miles.

Around town, I'm cool with that.  But what if my destination is 400 miles, 500 miles or 600 miles away? 

1) Do I budget in time (how many hours) for a full recharge?  How long?
2) What if there's a waiting line to charge my car?
3) Will restaurants and hotels have a charging station at each parking space?
4) What will the cost of electricity be at these charging stations?  Similar to prices paid at home or sky-high prices?

Seems like the Lyriq and it's electric brothers & sisters are nice around town cars but are not ready for prime time over the road trips.

Am I missing something?  Does Cadillac have a plan for a road trip car?  Sounds like there won't be any "owned" Lyriqs at the GNs unless the owner is near the destination.

I'd seriously look at buying one but the range limit is a non-starter.  I'm at the stage of my life that I want more than an around town car.

Seems like we have a loooooong way to go in only 9 or 14 years.  Cart before the horse?

Thoughts?



Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Mike Baillargeon #15848 on April 24, 2021, 03:34:52 PM
I still don't think they've thought this whole thing thru.....

We'll need one of these to follow us around for that quick charge for another  "76 miles"

Mike
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: chrisntam on April 24, 2021, 03:40:13 PM
Quote from: Mike Baillargeon  #15848 on April 24, 2021, 03:34:52 PM
I still don't think they've thought this whole thing thru.....
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Mike Josephic CLC #3877 on April 24, 2021, 06:53:21 PM
I agree with the OP.  I stated a long time ago that
these lithium battery cars were not ready for prime
time.  Did you read about the recent Tesla crash
where 2 people were turned into crispy critters due
to the battery pack igniting after a crash?
https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/18/22390612/two-people-killed-fiery-tesla-crash-no-driver

The local fire department used over 30,000 gallons of
water to finally extinguish the fire (that's about 7
tanker trucks).  The lithium batteries kept re-igniting.
Look at the pics in the attached article.  Do you really
want to drive one of these?

They'll have to develop a safer and more advanced
form of electrical energy to power the "electric car"
of the future.  This will not happen in the time frame
being promoted to go all electric.

Mike
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: The Tassie Devil(le) on April 24, 2021, 09:12:52 PM
All I will say is that the travelling public will simply have to adapt to whatever is put in their way.

Maybe having to take a long time to recharge might enable occupants on a long trip, time to revive themselves for the next leg of their trip.   No more driving for 10 hours at a time.

Can't see any EV in my future, as by the time they hit the used car market, at a price that I can afford, I will be long gone from this world.

Bruce. >:D

PS.   But, as I say, never say never, as things can, and do change.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: mgrab on April 24, 2021, 09:29:43 PM
This weeks crash 'n burn is not the first.. few of these under investigation.  Clearly, they weren't operating the car safely if no one was behind the wheel but, should the punishment be burning to death?  A friend of mine has wanted one of these for a few years now.  When the physician died in one a couple years ago I sent him the article and said he should ask the dealer if you get a copy of The Wicker Man.  I sent him this one too and his response was "Darwin wins again".  A short time later I read the owner was a physician.  I drive through and in Atlanta a couple times a week.  Most days there are at least 2-3 major accidents with a jacked up red or black truck and a Challenger.  A few weeks ago I saw a Mercedes on top of a minivan on the downtown connector (don't even know how you do that).  I only see two, maybe three Teslas a day. Most drive conservatively that I see... have a GA Tech sticker in window etc.. what happens when everyone is forced to drive these things?  I don't think there's enough water on the planet to put out that many fires.  I get it statistically speaking they are safer however, if asked to rank first to last all the ways I'd want to die in a car - last, dead last is burned to death.  There's a reason the saying is burning in hell, it's the worst thing that can happen to you.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Abe Lugo on April 24, 2021, 11:26:06 PM
One thing I don't see being talked about is the subscription-like service that you will have to keep paying on a car you "own"
I guess we would have to think of our cars like a smart phone and app can be free but you have pay up for the better version. 

One such example of this is that Tesla actually have a farther range than spec'd.  Depending on the level of the model you purchased  they lock out features.  You know likeLudacris mode. Even the autopilot. Then you will have to your car unlocked at some point to access all these feature without handing to pay up. 

The right to self repair is something being fought for hard in Europe.  Just like apple doesn't like someone unlocking or repairing phones. 

Just some food for thought.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Jamurray on April 25, 2021, 10:40:16 AM
I live in Connecticut. I see more than a few Teslas with California tags. They had to get here somehow, and I doubt they got here on a truck. When we go out to dinner, the most we'd ever drive would never exceed 200 miles. There are a lot of electrics out there with that much range. The IC engine in today's cars has just become too complicated for its own good.

I work part time for a new car dealer. The brand is not a domestic maker. They make two models: those that have had engines replaced and those that soon will. I'm not sure that brand is unique.

I remember when cast iron V8s were bulletproof. Those days are gone. I'm of the opinion the electric motor is the power plant of the future.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Cape Cod Fleetwood on April 25, 2021, 01:29:19 PM
Mike 30k gallons of water didn't put that fire out. The fire triangle simply closed when it ran out of
material to burn. But I love that fact 30K gallons of highly contaminated water entered the 'eco system' as
a result of a 'green' car, choking on the irony.

Water makes a Class D fire worse. AFFF won't work, even Halon makes it worse.

Only a dry powder, like sodium chloride, will put out a D fire reliably. MET-L-X and Novacool come to mind.
FedEx is the process of upgrading all of their aircraft's on board fire suppression systems to these since so much cargo includes lithium batteries. What's in the cargo area of your simple flight to Miami on "brand x airlines"? And has their fire suppression systems been upgraded?

So local and highway fire departments will have to buy/train with Class D fire trucks now, and how soon
before the next 'victim' of an electric car fire sues the state or municipality for NOT having a Class D truck immediately available? And who's going to pay for those trucks?

Maybe it will take a few more disasters before NHTSA declares these cars are too dangerous for the public in their current state of production.

If driving a 'green' car like Lyriq/Tesla etc makes you feel good, have fun, its America. Just remember you're not going too far and if it catches fire you're doomed if you don't get out in time and the car will be a total loss. Maybe the insurance companies could refuse to insure them because of this, that would help end this lunacy.

GM will be out of business in 9 years with this current thinking. Actually GM and other producers of consumer durables will be out of business/dramatically negatively impacted in less than a year so that point is moot. Full disclosure I've already sold any and all consumer durables stocks.

I'm really going to miss the Cadillac brand. But that's the least of our worries right now.

Oh, and enjoy your Lyriq!!!!
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Mike Josephic CLC #3877 on April 25, 2021, 05:24:39 PM
Hi Laurie:

Interesting comment.  You are correct, the fire
wasn't put out by the water -- these fires have
to burn themselves out.  That was the story in
the media. See below for the real story.

However, your chemistry is a little off base. 
Lithium batteries actually do not contain any
lithium metal.  Instead, they contain lithium
hydroxide dissolved in an organic solvent,
that creates the batteries electrolyte solution. 
In a situation such as an accident and fire, each
kilo of lithium hydroxide will emit 2,800 liters
of hydrogen gas which is extremely flammable
(remember the Hindenburg).

The resulting fire is more than hot enough to melt
steel.

The proper classification is a "Class B flammable liquid"
and the proper extinguisher would be an ABC or BC
type for smaller fires.

For a fire like the Tesla created, a mist of water is
usually sprayed on the fire to keep the temperature
down and prevent the spread of the flames.
The fire eventually (sometimes takes days) will burn
itself out.  That's why so much water was used.

For additional information:
https://www.airseacontainers.com/blog/how-to-put-out-lithium-battery-fire/

Mike
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: TJ Hopland on April 25, 2021, 05:32:04 PM
Do you suppose the conversation was similar 100 or so years ago?   Why give up your horse or mule?   Why would you ever want to go more than 10 or 20 miles in a day?
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Glen on April 26, 2021, 01:40:01 AM
Quote from: TJ Hopland on April 25, 2021, 05:32:04 PM
Do you suppose the conversation was similar 100 or so years ago?   Why give up your horse or mule?   Why would you ever want to go more than 10 or 20 miles in a day?

...and why would you want to carry around 5 gallons of that very flammable gasoline?   

And if you were out late you could doze off and the horse would take you right to your door. 
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 26, 2021, 02:08:38 PM
Quote from: Mike Josephic  CLC #3877 on April 24, 2021, 06:53:21 PM
I agree with the OP.  I stated a long time ago that
these lithium battery cars were not ready for prime
time.  Did you read about the recent Tesla crash
where 2 people were turned into crispy critters due
to the battery pack igniting after a crash?
https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/18/22390612/two-people-killed-fiery-tesla-crash-no-driver

The local fire department used over 30,000 gallons of
water to finally extinguish the fire (that's about 7
tanker trucks).  The lithium batteries kept re-igniting.
Look at the pics in the attached article.  Do you really
want to drive one of these?

They'll have to develop a safer and more advanced
form of electrical energy to power the "electric car"
of the future.  This will not happen in the time frame
being promoted to go all electric.

Mike
This article has already been confirmed as false by the fire chief that was on scene.

"With respect to the fire fight, unfortunately, those rumors grew way out of control. It did not take us four hours to put out the blaze. Our guys got there and put down the fire within two to three minutes, enough to see the vehicle had occupants. After that, it was simply cooling the car as the batteries continued to have a chain reaction due to damage."
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 26, 2021, 02:16:32 PM
As for charging, I suggest that you take a look a www.plugshare.com (http://www.plugshare.com) to get an idea of what charging is available in the areas you commonly travel. When filtering for DC fast chargers, use the CCS plug as that is what the Lyriq will have. There are a number of different charging networks (think gas station brands) with Electrify America being the most common for the type of plug that the Lyriq has. For charging at shopping centers, hotels, and other destinations, the Lyriq can use any plug that is available, even the Tesla plug with an adapter (but not the Tesla Supercharger DC fast chargers). It's very common these days that hotels will have plugs available for patrons to use. When I travel, I make that a requirement. Charging costs vary but generally, the DC fast chargers will be the pay per use type while the slower ones that are at destinations, shopping, and hotels are free. Overall, the charging standard that the Lyriq uses is fairly robust but still a little rough around the edges.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Andrew Trout on April 26, 2021, 03:06:41 PM
This general topic (viability of EV) has come up several times on the forum, which is great in that there's just more curiosity and awareness. Range anxiety is certainly a concern for me as well when it comes to purchasing a EV or PHEV (plug-in hybrid EV). One plan I've had is for my wife and I to have one EV/PHEV in the household as the car for running around town and short trips, and one car with an ICE as the long-haul/events in more rural areas/backup for the EV car. My wife has been working from home for the past year with no return date in site, so if we had a EV/PHEV our gas costs would be miniscule right now. Her car is paid off though, so we're good with our current setup.

Recharging in general is going to take some adapting by all of us. We all (probably) have it in our heads that we drive an EV the same was as an ICE: Drive until the energy/fuel level gets to a certain point, look for a place to top off, do so, and then hit the road again. With an EV, recharging is not a linear progression like it is with refueling. For a hypothetical example, you're at 20% power in your EV. You find a charging station and plug in. Your EV may take 60+ minutes to reach 100%, but only 20 minutes to reach 80%. Depending on how far away your destination is and where the next charging station is, it may be a more efficient use of your time (you get there faster) to only charge to 80% and start driving again. Much like how fuel economy and HP are points of differentiation between cars now, range and charge time will most likely be big ones in the future.

I can't comment on charging station lines, only to say I see lines to fill up at gas stations as well. Theoretically a charging station could have more maximum capacity than a gas station, and it's starting to become commonplace to have a few chargers in parking garages and parking lots, as well as larger charging stations off highways. Business are always looking to find ways to attract customers, and landlords are looking for ways to maximize the revenue from every square inch of their property. Charging stations are a new retail concept that appeals to both of those groups, and are starting to roll out across the country.

The cost to recharge away from your home will most likely vary based on a myriad of small costs, similar to how the cost of gasoline can vary depending on what state, county, or town you're in, along with what company you're purchasing from. I wouldn't be surprised to see complementary charging at hotels, reduced cost charging at bars, restaurants, or venues for customers, and membership-only wholesale clubs like BJ's or Costco offering (reduced) charging for members as well.


Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 26, 2021, 03:27:06 PM
Quote from: Andrew Trout on April 26, 2021, 03:06:41 PM
This general topic (viability of EV) has come up several times on the forum, which is great in that there's just more curiosity and awareness. Range anxiety is certainly a concern for me as well when it comes to purchasing a EV or PHEV (plug-in hybrid EV). One plan I've had is for my wife and I to have one EV/PHEV in the household as the car for running around town and short trips, and one car with an ICE as the long-haul/events in more rural areas/backup for the EV car. My wife has been working from home for the past year with no return date in site, so if we had a EV/PHEV our gas costs would be miniscule right now. Her car is paid off though, so we're good with our current setup.

Recharging in general is going to take some adapting by all of us. We all (probably) have it in our heads that we drive an EV the same was as an ICE: Drive until the energy/fuel level gets to a certain point, look for a place to top off, do so, and then hit the road again. With an EV, recharging is not a linear progression like it is with refueling. For a hypothetical example, you're at 20% power in your EV. You find a charging station and plug in. Your EV may take 60+ minutes to reach 100%, but only 20 minutes to reach 80%. Depending on how far away your destination is and where the next charging station is, it may be a more efficient use of your time (you get there faster) to only charge to 80% and start driving again. Much like how fuel economy and HP are points of differentiation between cars now, range and charge time will most likely be big ones in the future.

I can't comment on charging station lines, only to say I see lines to fill up at gas stations as well. Theoretically a charging station could have more maximum capacity than a gas station, and it's starting to become commonplace to have a few chargers in parking garages and parking lots, as well as larger charging stations off highways. Business are always looking to find ways to attract customers, and landlords are looking for ways to maximize the revenue from every square inch of their property. Charging stations are a new retail concept that appeals to both of those groups, and are starting to roll out across the country.

The cost to recharge away from your home will most likely vary based on a myriad of small costs, similar to how the cost of gasoline can vary depending on what state, county, or town you're in, along with what company you're purchasing from. I wouldn't be surprised to see complementary charging at hotels, reduced cost charging at bars, restaurants, or venues for customers, and membership-only wholesale clubs like BJ's or Costco offering (reduced) charging for members as well.
For us at out house with electricity at ~11 cents per kw/h, 1000 miles costs about $30. You are correct in saying that it can very greatly when out on the road. In some states, it's not legal for a company to resell electricity so you are charged by the minute, usually at a tiered rate depending on power consumption, in other states you are charged by the kw/h. Some charging networks offer subscription services for discounted rates if you frequently need to use DC fast charging. Station lines generally relegated to some specific, high traffic locations in and around major routes in California. I have traveled all up and down the east coast and I can only recall one time when there was a full location and that was several years ago before DC fast charging stations were a prevalent. It does take a bit of a shift in your mindset. Generally, you charge overnight and leave in the morning with a "full tank". Range is long enough now that unless you are on a road trip, charging when you are out and about is just not something you do. On a 575 mile trip that my wife and I have taken many, many times in many different vehicles, the charging now has a net time cost of zero since we now charge at the location that we normally stop at to eat.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Mike Josephic CLC #3877 on April 26, 2021, 03:44:46 PM
Mar:

Regarding this quote you posted:
"With respect to the fire fight, unfortunately, those rumors grew way out of control. It did not take us four hours to put out the blaze. Our guys got there and put down the fire within two to three minutes, enough to see the vehicle had occupants. After that, it was simply cooling the car as the batteries continued to have a chain reaction due to damage."

Can you please supply a link to the original article?  I'm
curious to see the whole picture.  Thanks.

Mike
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 26, 2021, 03:48:22 PM
Quote from: Mike Josephic  CLC #3877 on April 26, 2021, 03:44:46 PM
Mar:

Regarding this quote you posted:
"With respect to the fire fight, unfortunately, those rumors grew way out of control. It did not take us four hours to put out the blaze. Our guys got there and put down the fire within two to three minutes, enough to see the vehicle had occupants. After that, it was simply cooling the car as the batteries continued to have a chain reaction due to damage."

Can you please supply a link to the original article?  I'm
curious to see the whole picture.  Thanks.

Mike

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a36189237/tesla-model-s-fire-texas-crash-details-fire-chief/ (https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a36189237/tesla-model-s-fire-texas-crash-details-fire-chief/)
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: dinhnguyen57 on April 26, 2021, 07:46:28 PM
I wonder how electric cars fair in winter or colder climates?  Batteries are less efficient.  Are these cars still dependable?  I heard the range can drop by 50% in cold weather.

-Dinh
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: TJ Hopland on April 26, 2021, 08:15:28 PM
Here is a guy that has a lot of good car related videos including a recent one where he repeated a road trip he did in the summer in the winter in his Tesla.   He has a lot of EV related videos where he actually puts numbers to things.  Engineering Explained is the channel name if you don't like links.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UskzfQJt2Bc
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 27, 2021, 10:05:56 AM
Quote from: dinhnguyen57 on April 26, 2021, 07:46:28 PM
I wonder how electric cars fair in winter or colder climates?  Batteries are less efficient.  Are these cars still dependable?  I heard the range can drop by 50% in cold weather.

-Dinh
You do see a noticeable, temporary drop in range when the battery is cold. On many EV models, you have the option of preconditioning the battery before you start your trip to help mitigate this range reduction. You would set the car up with your typical routine and the car will warm or cool the battery (and the cabin also) before you set out. Obviously, the ideal situation would also have the car plugged to avoid consuming range while this is happening. With EVs commonly have ranges of 300 miles or more though these days, even a significant temperature related range reduction is not enough to hinder day to day driving so the preconditioning feature for the battery is not needed as much as it was on older, shorter range EVs from several years ago. 
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: dinhnguyen57 on April 27, 2021, 03:29:33 PM
Thank you Mitchell and TJ.  The video and information were very useful.  All of my friends who own Tesla vehicles really like them.  They do complain about quality control issues, but once those have been worked out,  their vehicles have been relatively trouble-free.  My other friends who drive non-tesla electric cars also like them but it seems they all complain about computer and programing issues that keep arising from time to time.

I was at the Chevy/Cadillac dealership recently for some maintenance for by STS and I test drove the Chevy Bolt. I loved the quietness of the car and smooth acceleration and power.  The interior was a bit "cheap" in the materials though. It retailed for $39,000 but had up to a $17,000  of rebates at the time.  I walked away from that experience clearly seeing the end of gasoline engines and future of electric.  The benefits and impact to the environment from electric cars versus gasoline ones, are still debatable though.

Hoping for a successful transition for Cadillac into electrification.  It's inevitable.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: TJ Hopland on April 27, 2021, 09:30:37 PM
Service is one thing that I hear is pretty terrible across the board.    Tesla is just overwhelmed in most markets so long wait times just to get in and it sounded like they were using the apple model where there really isn't much or any parts stock at the service centers so you have to wait for the parts to come in once you finally get the car in.     

The rest of the brands just don't see enough E models to have have more than the most basic trouble shooting skills in house.  I hear lots of stories of cars spending weeks in service waiting for a traveling specialist to come and diagnose and then its waiting for the parts and hope the local people can install them. 

You wonder that is why Cadillac is planning on going in deep with several models?   Maybe they will be the first to actually be able to support EVs? 
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 28, 2021, 08:47:18 AM
Quote from: TJ Hopland on April 27, 2021, 09:30:37 PM
Service is one thing that I hear is pretty terrible across the board.    Tesla is just overwhelmed in most markets so long wait times just to get in and it sounded like they were using the apple model where there really isn't much or any parts stock at the service centers so you have to wait for the parts to come in once you finally get the car in.     

The rest of the brands just don't see enough E models to have have more than the most basic trouble shooting skills in house.  I hear lots of stories of cars spending weeks in service waiting for a traveling specialist to come and diagnose and then its waiting for the parts and hope the local people can install them. 

You wonder that is why Cadillac is planning on going in deep with several models?   Maybe they will be the first to actually be able to support EVs?
I have not had any issues with service and Tesla is not even legally allowed to have any retail stores or service centers in my state. The techs come to me and for the few issues that I have had, they fix it where I'm at with no need for me to go anywhere. The vast majority of complaints you hear about are from Southern California where some of the service centers are overwhelmed. It's the same thing with the Supercharger locations, there are a few specific locations that are on heavily traveled routes in California that often have lines but that is the exception, not the rule.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: TJ Hopland on April 28, 2021, 10:06:07 AM
I had not heard that Tesla was doing mobile service but I suppose if its in a state where they can't operate they had to come up with something.    I had not looked at that list for a while,  looks like they are down to just 3 states where they can't operate service centers.  New Mexico, Alabama, and South Carolina.   10 states including those 3 where they can't directly sell but maybe those are where they have a 'showroom' where you can look and test drive?    I see that they got into Michigan and Colorado finally last year.   You would have thought that Michigan would have been a hold out.  I think I read that the no direct sales laws originated there way back in the early days of automobiles. 
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Big Apple Caddy on April 28, 2021, 11:05:14 AM
In the coming years, range, charging times, charging station availability, etc. will continue to improve and will be much less of a factor especially by the time BEVs account for a significant portion of sales.

Tesla tends to get low marks in the areas of quality (e.g., paint, fit and finish) and customer service but the hope is that as EV competition increases, Tesla will finally have to put more effort and emphasis there or they'll lose customers.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 28, 2021, 11:51:31 AM
Quote from: TJ Hopland on April 28, 2021, 10:06:07 AM
I had not heard that Tesla was doing mobile service but I suppose if its in a state where they can't operate they had to come up with something.    I had not looked at that list for a while,  looks like they are down to just 3 states where they can't operate service centers.  New Mexico, Alabama, and South Carolina.   10 states including those 3 where they can't directly sell but maybe those are where they have a 'showroom' where you can look and test drive?    I see that they got into Michigan and Colorado finally last year.   You would have thought that Michigan would have been a hold out.  I think I read that the no direct sales laws originated there way back in the early days of automobiles.
Tesla has offered Mobile Service almost from day one. The no direct sales laws are hold overs from when car manufactures would sell franchising rights, let the franchisees get the market set up and then swoop in and undercut their own franchises. That has not been a relevant argument for about 100 years but it's still being used to hamper direct sales of cars even though no other product is regulated like that.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Harley Earl on April 28, 2021, 02:00:39 PM
I routinely utilize Electrify America for charging on longer trips (EASY!).  Been EV on my daily driver since 2015.  The "EV related" planning before a longer trip has become less and less with increasing charging stations in the last six years.  I live in the Central Valley of California so your mileage may vary, literally and figuratively.  I see very few issues with going towards an EV future for our primary cars.  Cadillac is to be commended, in my opinion, for taking this bold move.  Quick charging is just that, QUICK. Plus it is relaxing to take a break/nap in climate-controlled comfort while charging up.  Add in that most of your "fill ups" are done in your own CAVE aka Garage and you have a winning solution. 

To add a bit; I purchased my most current EV direct from my local Audi dealer, delivered to my home by said dealer and all paperwork signed in my garage on my terms.  Everything done online for the sale.  Cadillac; take note, as this is the way that many of your current & future CUSTOMERS, prefer to transact business (with exception to a test drive and/or demonstration appointment).  Servicing has been outstanding, no waits for anything.  Customer service is excellent, fit & finish outstanding and I am not getting juiced for my last dollar as the real dough is made in the back of the dealership, not the front...All things for Cadillac to strive for to increase market share.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: MaR on April 28, 2021, 03:25:53 PM
Quote from: Harley Earl on April 28, 2021, 02:00:39 PM
I routinely utilize Electrify America for charging on longer trips (EASY!).  Been EV on my daily driver since 2015.  The "EV related" planning before a longer trip has become less and less with increasing charging stations in the last six years.  I live in the Central Valley of California so your mileage may vary, literally and figuratively.  I see very few issues with going towards an EV future for our primary cars.  Cadillac is to be commended, in my opinion, for taking this bold move.  Quick charging is just that, QUICK. Plus it is relaxing to take a break/nap in climate-controlled comfort while charging up.  Add in that most of your "fill ups" are done in your own CAVE aka Garage and you have a winning solution. 

To add a bit; I purchased my most current EV direct from my local Audi dealer, delivered to my home by said dealer and all paperwork signed in my garage on my terms.  Everything done online for the sale.  Cadillac; take note, as this is the way that many of your current & future CUSTOMERS, prefer to transact business (with exception to a test drive and/or demonstration appointment).  Servicing has been outstanding, no waits for anything.  Customer service is excellent, fit & finish outstanding and I am not getting juiced for my last dollar as the real dough is made in the back of the dealership, not the front...All things for Cadillac to strive for to increase market share.

Yep, my last two new car purchases were from the comfort of my home and they only thing I did at the sales center was sign for and take possession of the car. They even offered to deliver the car to me.
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: Big Apple Caddy on April 29, 2021, 08:27:59 AM
Quote from: Harley Earl on April 28, 2021, 02:00:39 PM
To add a bit; I purchased my most current EV direct from my local Audi dealer, delivered to my home by said dealer and all paperwork signed in my garage on my terms.  Everything done online for the sale.  Cadillac; take note, as this is the way that many of your current & future CUSTOMERS, prefer to transact business (with exception to a test drive and/or demonstration appointment).

Cadillac and other GM brands already offer that at participating dealerships.  The pandemic pushed more manufacturers and dealers towards providing online buying and home delivery options for customers.  It still only accounts for a small percentage of transactions but is growing.    https://www.cadillac.com/shop-click-drive
Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: jwwseville60 on January 18, 2022, 02:04:06 PM
EV cars are the future, no doubt about it.
But as of 2022, none are really ready for prime time, even the Mercedes S class EV.
There are not enough charging stations, and there needs to be multiple ones in every single gas station, or as many competing EV charging stations to balance it out. Too slow to charge now.

In 6-8 years, the EV will mostly work globally. New generations of battery tech not using Lithium is key. Lithium is in short supply and has to be transported for refinement on diesel ships back and forth to several countries.

Yet keep in mind that many people have done a metric that says if 50% of America went EV tomorrow, our electrical power grid would COLLAPSE.

Fusion power and zero-point energy is coming on line from GE and Lockheed-Martin Energy, but its purposefully slow as to not destroy the oil, coal, and gas economy too quick.

TESLA is a military tech contractor, don't be fooled. It's not a car company. I don't care how fast they are, there's no dealer network. Elon Musk is all about driverless cars in the future, and that's troubling in my book. He's a dangerous tech messiah and a mental weirdo. Think CIA asset.

In 2030, I will buy a Cadillac EV.



Title: Re: Cadillac Lyriq, road trips and range concerns
Post by: bctexas on January 18, 2022, 06:48:25 PM
"jwwseville60" said "Yet keep in mind that many people have done a metric that says if 50% of America went EV tomorrow, our electrical power grid would COLLAPSE."

That is my biggest concern with the whole electric car craze.  Even if the generating capacity existed today to support the wholesale conversion to electric cars, the distribution capacity does not.  I have read estimates that generating capacity will have to increase by 1/3 in order to support EV's (I think that is optimistic).  Are we embarking on the decades-long process to build new power plants?  Not that I know of - I read more about old power plants being torn down.  And the cost of upgrading the distribution network will also be enormous and incredibly time consuming.  And all of this comes with environmental impacts that nobody seems to want to talk about.  Wind and Sun?  Good luck with that in the timeframes that are being discussed.

Will I live long enough to see the outcome of all this?  Not likely.  Just as well.  The torque filled joy of driving my '65 CDV and the thrill of a deftly executed double clutch/heel and toe downshift while approaching a corner in my '86 MR2 brand me as an old fuddy-duddy I suppose.  I cannot envision an electric car with the charm of any of my old cars.....

BTW, I was in Los Angeles a couple years ago - the local car guys there refer to the vast number of Teslas on the roads there as the "Malibu Prius". 

Happy Motoring!