Author Topic: Seville San Remo  (Read 1352 times)

Gene Moscicki

  • Guest
Seville San Remo
« on: September 04, 2009, 05:06:43 PM »
#15 is on Ebay #170378368939.
The vin on this car is less than 70 units before mine, note the 78 steering wheel on a 79 car.  owner states it was built that way with left over parts??
Well back to my car, it is a 79 in ALL places a 79 should be YET get this it was 1st titled in may of 78. How can that be? Did Coach Design Group get the 79s that early??
Someone out bvthere has to know more about the San Remo story. :o

Offline Otto Skorzeny

  • Posts: 3853
  • 1956 Coupe de Ville aka Bismarck
Re: Seville San Remo
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2009, 06:12:55 PM »
Left over parts. I don't know if GM did that a lot but Ford is notorious for not letting last year's parts go to waste.

The first 1965 Mustangs had generators from the 1964 parts bin. When they exhausted the supply, alternators were installed as they were on all the rest of the '65 model Fords.

Early 1979 Ford F series pickups have 1978 headlights and surrounds (round). After they ran out,  the rest of the 1979 trucks got square headlights and surrounds.
fward

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Misfit

  • Guest
Re: Seville San Remo
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2009, 08:55:22 PM »
Just one more reason Furd stood their ground against the bailout money, and GM went under.

MisFit

Offline Otto Skorzeny

  • Posts: 3853
  • 1956 Coupe de Ville aka Bismarck
Re: Seville San Remo
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2009, 09:24:13 PM »
It's funny how a corporate culture can last through decades and decades and many different management teams.

Henry Ford required certain parts suppliers ship Model T parts to the factory in wooden crates built to his specifications - some with holes drilled in seemingly random places.

The parts were unpacked and the crates were carefully broken down. With very little additional carpentry work they were ready to be installed as dashes and floorboards in Model Ts.

Very smart.
fward

Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for YOURSELF

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Offline Rich S

  • Posts: 601
Re: Seville San Remo
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2009, 09:32:42 PM »
I've often seen the San Remos with "after market" steering wheels, such as those by Nardi. Could it be that since the cars were so customized, some may have had the after-market steering wheels, and then an owner possibly converted it back to a more "stock" steering wheel?

The car on e-bay looks really nice. I've always loved the Seville San Remo Convertible conversions--since I first read the reviews of them "back in the day," (when I was 15 years old!) and I have saved several pieces about these well-done conversions in my literature collection. With their proportions, and hand crafted extra leather interiors, they provided competition for the Rolls-Royce Corniche Convertible of that era. In my opinion, it does not seem likely that a '79 model could have been registered as such back in May of '78.  8)
Rich Sullivan CLC #11473

1971 Eldo Conv., 2013 CTS Cpe

 

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