2013 ATS

Started by Matt CLC#18621, February 11, 2013, 01:02:26 AM

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Matt CLC#18621

Thoughts on 2013 ATS?

Thanks,

Matt
CLC# 18621

Gene Beaird

It's supposed to be a nice little car.  The reviews and many of the posts on the forums from owners of these cars are mostly positive.  There are rumors of a ATS-V being built, so speculation it rampant about whether or not it'll be a hotted-up V6 or V8.

I'm still struggling with the CUE, which I think is standard on all ATSs.  Too many electronics to go wrong IMHO.

Gene Beaird,
1968 Calais
1979 Seville
Pearland, Texas
CLC Member No. 29873

Bill Ingler #7799

Hi Gene: I bought the new Cad XTS in August. Although the new ATS was not out, it was said to be a lot smaller especially in rear leg room. I am glad I went with the XTS. I like the new XTS but not really sold on the CUE system. I am fairly knowledgeable on a computer but still it took many hours sitting alone in the car trying to understand how to work the radio, heater/air and navigation. Whenever you buy a car and they give you an Ipad with the car which is programed to tell you how to operate the car, then they have just cut out a whole lot of potential customers for that car. You are in a world of hurt if you do not even know how to work an Ipad. Don`t get me wrong, after finding out the working of the CUE, I enjoy my new 2013 Cadillac. My big complaint even though I now understand the working of CUE, it can be a distraction trying to program the CUE while driving.  Bill

Big Apple Caddy

#3
The CUE system is still an option, i.e. not required, on the base "Standard Collection" models.

It's roughly the size of a Chevrolet Cruze and import competitors are cars like the BMW 3-Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class.

Louis Smith

On Cadillacs website they call the ATS, "compact luxury sport ".  Sounds like an oxymoron to me.  Those of us with more miles on our personal odometers then we care to admit, might remember when "compact" cars were first introduced with Studebaker Lark, Chevrolet Corvair, Ford Falcon, and Plymouth Valiant.  These were produced to make new car ownership more affordable.  Perish the thought that Cadillac would ever get involved in this market!  We all know what happened when Cadillac made an attempt with the introduction of the Cimmaron.  Cadillacs up to that time were associated with size and comfort.  Of course since Cadillac has long been dethroned as being the luxury car king, maybe this time they will be more successful, with a "compact".  To me this is just another reminder, that to GM this is just a product to generate profit.  They just run it up the flag pole and see if anyone salutes.

Walter Youshock

Notice, too, that as cars are getting smaller, people are getting BIGGER?

Maybe they'll start "2 for 1" sales.
CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

Big Apple Caddy

Quote from: Louis Smith on February 11, 2013, 01:33:32 PM
We all know what happened when Cadillac made an attempt with the introduction of the Cimmaron.

Although I haven't yet driven one I think it's safe to say that the ATS is a much better car than the Cimarron was but I definitely agree that the so-called luxury market has changed.  Imports which have long been known for and more accepted for their smaller luxury cars are largely steering the ship right now.  The large luxury cars, which brands like Cadillac and Lincoln had been best known for, have fallen a bit out of favor.  Maybe...hopefully...things will swing back again but it's doubtful that cars the size of DeVilles or Fleetwoods of the past will be best sellers for Cadillac anytime soon.  Today it's all about smaller sedans and crossovers or SUVs and increasing sales by lowering prices/payments.  Being able to afford/buy a new Cadillac et al is no longer the "luxury" it used to be.

Louis Smith

i suspect the one of the reasons for the success of the truck market, is that they offer the size and comfort of big cars in the past.

Andrew Armitage

It's a smart move by Cadillac. If you don't capture the 20 something crowd as they come out of college, you are going to lose them to BMW (3 series) and the likes. When they are moving into larger cars down the road, they will be moving up to BMW 5/7 series and not jumping from BMW to a Cadillac XTS.

I think it's a strong competitor to BMW, MB, and Audi. Cadillac definitely turned itself around starting with the introduction of the CTS. 10 years ago, it was rare to see anyone that wasn't a member of AARP driving a Caddy. Now it's definitely appealing to a younger crowd. I'd still like to see a full sized Cadillac in the $75+ range to compete with the 7 series BMW / S Class MB.

My only complaint with the ATS is the black plastic grills on the ones I've seen. If I'm driving a Cadillac, I want a sharp, chrome grill like the XTS or CTS.

The Cimmeron was a rebadged Chevy. It was cheap and boring. These CTSs and ATSs are cutting edge cars that can hold their own in styling and performance.
Andrew Armitage
Plainfield, IL
1941 67 Series
1966 Fleetwood 75 Series
1985 Seville
1991 Eldorado

jock82

Although, I am not a fan of small cars, I do like the looks of the ATS much better than the XTS.  I would probably never consider one, as I would not consider buying an XTS.  If I were in the market for this type car,  I would probably buy one.  I prefer a large luxury car which no one make anymore.

Guy Moore
CLC#12650
1989 Sedan de Ville
1994 Concours
2009 DTS'
1976 Olds 98 Regency

Guy Moore CLC# 12650

Louis Smith

Quote from: Andrew Armitage on February 11, 2013, 10:54:34 PM
It's a smart move by Cadillac. If you don't capture the 20 something crowd as they come out of college, you are going to lose them to BMW (3 series) and the likes. When they are moving into larger cars down the road, they will be moving up to BMW 5/7 series and not jumping from BMW to a Cadillac XTS.



I guess it all depends on what college that are coming out and how well they did.  From what I read, many college grads are having a very hard time finding jobs.

Gene Beaird

Quote from: Walter Youshock on February 11, 2013, 01:51:29 PM
Notice, too, that as cars are getting smaller, people are getting BIGGER?

Maybe they'll start "2 for 1" sales.

They introduce the car in it's small form, then 'grow' it in subsequent model years.  I've watched it happen with nearly every Ni$$an, Toyota and Honduh model that's ever come to these shores.

@Bill, I'm quite at home with computers, but personally find no use for these integrated 'infotainment' systems they're putting into cars these days.  As integrated as they are getting in the actual operation of the car, I see these electronic gee-whiz gadgets being the reason we find many of these cars in junk yards way before their time. 

I'm sure if we got one with that junk in it, we'd learn how to use it pretty easily.  I'm not known as one who is in the car trading business.  Most of the cars we own are kept for several decades, if sold off at all.  I'd _HATE_ to have to get rid of a car because it no longer starts because the display screen no longer works, and the manufacturer no longer makes the screen, or the failed electronic component that will make it start again.  I see that as a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future.

But if I had to have a DD, and traded cars in every 4 or 5 years, one of these new whiz-bang boomboxes on wheels might be quite a treat.   ;D
Gene Beaird,
1968 Calais
1979 Seville
Pearland, Texas
CLC Member No. 29873

Big Apple Caddy

Quote from: Andrew Armitage on February 11, 2013, 10:54:34 PM
It's a smart move by Cadillac. If you don't capture the 20 something crowd as they come out of college, you are going to lose them to BMW (3 series) and the likes. When they are moving into larger cars down the road, they will be moving up to BMW 5/7 series and not jumping from BMW to a Cadillac XTS.

I agree that getting younger people into the brand can help build unit sales and hopefully long-term loyalty but Cadillac IMO was never meant to be the low price, relatively speaking, brand it has become.  Having prices starting below $34,000 tied with extra long-term financing terms, very low lease payment deals,  etc. will of course attract a younger demographic due to greater affordability but you also take away at least some of the prestige of ownership that Cadillac was supposed to represent.  Even the XTS has a fairly low cost of entry when you look at the prices, lease offers, finance terms, etc. available vs. times past.

This is not a criticism of today's cars or GM’s revised business model but rather disappointment that Cadillac has been forced to take on the lower end market instead of Buick, now that Oldsmobile and Pontiac are gone, being able to carry more of that responsibility as they would've in the past.  Unfortunately, I don't think Cadillac had much choice in order to compete in today's changed luxury marketplace where the definition of "luxury" as far as prices and payments keeps falling.

Perhaps it's mostly nostalgia talking but I prefer the days when people could be loyal to GM by starting with Chevrolet then Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick and ultimately Cadillac instead of more or less starting at a downgraded (price and payment-wise) Cadillac and moving up within the brand.

Andrew Armitage

Quote from: Big Apple Caddy on February 12, 2013, 10:54:34 AM
I agree that getting younger people into the brand can help build unit sales and hopefully long-term loyalty but Cadillac IMO was never meant to be the low price, relatively speaking, brand it has become.  Having prices starting below $34,000 tied with extra long-term financing terms, very low lease payment deals,  etc. will of course attract a younger demographic due to greater affordability but you also take away at least some of the prestige of ownership that Cadillac was supposed to represent.  Even the XTS has a fairly low cost of entry when you look at the prices, lease offers, finance terms, etc. available vs. times past.

This is not a criticism of today's cars or GM’s revised business model but rather disappointment that Cadillac has been forced to take on the lower end market instead of Buick, now that Oldsmobile and Pontiac are gone, being able to carry more of that responsibility as they would've in the past.  Unfortunately, I don't think Cadillac had much choice in order to compete in today's changed luxury marketplace where the definition of "luxury" as far as prices and payments keeps falling.

Perhaps it's mostly nostalgia talking but I prefer the days when people could be loyal to GM by starting with Chevrolet then Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick and ultimately Cadillac instead of more or less starting at a downgraded (price and payment-wise) Cadillac and moving up within the brand.

I agree that the old marketing idea of being able to move up through the model lines as you were able to progress through life / success mirrored societal values. Society and the market has drastically changed and it was a necessary step if Cadillac wanted to survive. I think one of the only reasons Buick is still around is that it sells very well overseas.
Andrew Armitage
Plainfield, IL
1941 67 Series
1966 Fleetwood 75 Series
1985 Seville
1991 Eldorado

soonerinmo

#14
As much as I love Cadillacs, I think there's still a little way to go to be back on par with Mercedes, BMW or Audi...or better. I've owned an '03 Audi and an '05 Cadillac; the CTS had a softer ride but the fit and finish seemed inferior as did the quality of materials used.

However, I have looked at the new XTS and ATS and they seem much better. I think Cadillac is closing in on the German luxury brands. Of course, Cadillacs used to be far superior to many of the foreign brands (like Audi/Auto Union) that are now luxury giants.
Brian Combs ><>

'67 Fleetwood Sixty Special (Sold)
'08 DTS

Aaron Hudacky

I like the ATS, but I wish it had a dual clutch automatic available and more torque.  A twin-turbo 3.6 V-6 would be fun in such a small, light car.  The proportions and styling are my favorite of all new Cadillacs.  It and the CTS-V seem like good products for winning sales from the German brands, and I would be happy to own either.  An ATS-V would, and hopefully will, be amazing.
1970 Eldorado
1978 Coupe deVille
1979 Coupe deVille
2008 Subaru STI

Louis Smith

Quote from: soonerinmo on February 13, 2013, 01:19:06 AM
As much as I love Cadillacs, I think there's still a little way to go to be back on par with Mercedes, BMW or Audi...or better. I've owned an '03 Audi and an '05 Cadillac; the CTS had a softer ride but the fit and finish seemed inferior as did the quality of materials used.

However, I have looked at the new XTS and ATS and they seem much better. I think Cadillac is closing in on the German luxury brands. Of course, Cadillacs used to be far superior to many of the foreign brands (like Audi/Auto Union) that are now luxury giants.

I think the "luxury" definition of cars has been redefined.  At one time Buick, Oldsmobile and Cadillac were considered "luxury" cars, albeit at different levels.  Luxury at that time was basically defined as comfort and options i.e. size, power steering, brakes windows, A/C etc.  Sure these options were available on Chevys and Pontiacs, but these buyers weren't really looking for luxury, and if they added some of these options, they might as well spent a little more and buy a Cadillac.  Today, most cars and trucks, have as standard equipment what the luxury cars of the past had.  It seems as though luxury today is defined today as being more what is offered in engineering then style and conveniences.  Of course comfort options are still highly desired, such as the Ford with its SUV that opens with the placing of the foot under the rear bumper.