Hershey 2014

Started by Jon S, October 12, 2014, 10:08:07 AM

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Jon S

Glad the weather held out and even Saturday worked out fine for the Show after a few morning sprinkles!
Jon

1958 Cadillac Sedan De Ville
1973 Lincoln Continental Coupe
1981 Corvette
2004 Mustang GT

Jeff Wilk

Great event again. Got some great finds at the swap meet and met some great friends. I did think the Cadillacs were very sparce this year though for the show.
"Impossible Only Describes The Degree Of Difficulty" 

Southern New Jersey

1959 Cadillac Fleetwood Sixty Special
1975 Eldorado Convertible (#12 made)
1976 Cadillac Mirage (factory authorized Pick-Up)
1933 Phaeton Chevrolet - "Baby Cadillac"
1933 Master Sedan Chevrolet - "Baby Cadillac"

SOLD
1958 Cadillac Sixty-Special
1958 Cadillac Sixty-Special
1958 Cadillac Sedan
1958 Cadillac Coupe Deville

Walter Youshock

Everything seemed pretty sparce this year.  The show field was really thin.  Even the parade spectators were only one line deep.   It was nice to see more vendors still open on Saturday.  I did,  however,  miss the club tent for the first time since 1998.  That's why work is a 4 - letter word!

First Hershey I could ever recall without a '59.  My favorite car this year was Della Chrysler's '37 Imperial town car.  Imagine that tooling the streets of Manhattan.   Or parked in front of the Chrysler building.  Drinks at the Cloud Club,  anyone?
CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

There were several '59s in the Car Corral.  8)
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Walter Youshock

Perhaps for sale but none on the show field.   By Saturday,  all the '59's were gone.

Harbinger?  Perhaps.   I've been going to Hershey for about 25 years.  Been there in 90 degree weather,  frost, rain, and even snow one year.  People who would never miss it didn't come out in drizzle.   We were up in the air until about 9.  Decided to go anyway.

Years past,  die hards made show day.  This year, I missed seeing a lot of people.  And, given the crowd and being by a Cadillac,  if they did attend,  they'd have stopped by. 
CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

Predictions of rain likely played a role nonetheless.
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Jeff Hansen

Traffic was brisk in the CLC tent.  Not many folks had trouble finding our new location.  I worked a shift on Thursday afternoon and another midday Friday; the volume of people was always constant.  I believe I heard Rob Robison indicate we had well over 100 people sign the guest book each day (not everyone does this).  We signed up (or had renew) a number of members including one gentleman from Europe who became a life member on the spot.

Jeff
Jeff Hansen
1941 6019S Sixty Special
1942 7533 Imperial Sedan

Walter Youshock

That was how I joined in '93.  Hot, we'll in the '80's.  Carried a carb all over I think from the old white field.  By the end of the day, I was shot.  See a Cadillac flag on a tent in the old green field an meet Bill and Jay Ann.   Signed up on the spot.

Got far better mileage from the club than that carburetor!  Worst part was it was after 3 and I still had to carry it and my other purchases back to the old stone barn on the hill behind white field where I was parked.

Great memories.   I still miss the old layout.  I used to know where everyone was by field.  Not anymore.

I don't,  however,  miss the mud.

CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

Walter Youshock

#8
Absolutely.  But I also remember a time where you seldom heard foreign languages spoken.   Yesterday,  I heard italian, spanish, Portuguese,  french,  swedish, German,  and even a little polish that I can understand.   

Thinking about it, even I can't believe how long I've been going.   But I still see a lot of young and vibrant hobbiests coming on board. 

Part of the evolution.   And it was fantastic to see the original 1905 Cadillac on the field.  What a prize.

As I look back, had I not bought my '57 when I did and refurbish it, I couldn't or wouldn't do it now. 

There was also a 92 year old man I've known for years there with a '55 Buick.   He'd never miss the show.   

Let's face it,  Hershey is the period of car season.  Everything you did last winter comes down to grand nationals and the second weekend of October.   Sick and tired and broke, we go home and find a way to improve these cars.  Only so we can trudge through more mud, spend more money we don't have just to keep the dream alive.

How empty would life be without family and old cars and other interests? 
CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

Walter Youshock

I think many of us graduated from first grade years ago.  Given everything,  I'm on my third PHD! 

I'm energized not only to see guys my own mid-40 range in the hobby, whether new or old to it, but I also see slightly older ones getting more involved as well as far younger members.  When I come across a guy in his mid 20 ' s with a passion and knowledge like Mike Casio,   this hobby will carry on.

What I don't see, however,  is the older guys we all relied upon for parts spending days on end living in trailers just to vend their wares at a flea market.  Sad. 
CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

C.R. Patton II



Hello

Glad to read the Cadillac & LaSalle Club Tent was joyful.

I plan to attend Hershey on regular basis upon reaching retirement.  I have fond memories of Hershey.  Scouring the fields and boxes with Matt Larson for LaSalle parts.  Oh to live the utopian life!

Our hobby will continue to thrive as long as we cultivate and nurture young minds about the Standard of the World.

All good men own a Cadillac but great gentlemen drive a LaSalle. That is the consequence of success.

59-in-pieces

IMHO, Will is correct along with others who have lamented the good ol'days, and the lack of vendors, and fewer attendees, and OEM restorations.

We are all getting a little longer in the tooth, and have switched from the days of the cash flowing jobs, to that of less cash flowing to buy those fewer remaining parts at their increasing scarcity and ever growing price - which puts more strain on an OEM restoration.  Oh, and lets not forget that it is harder to get up from the floor than it used to be.

It's no surprise then that the classic cars are fewer and those that can be found are at least being kept in circulation by "resto-moders".  Here the reproduction market has let us "ol'schoolers" down - no volume I suppose, while the after market for modern parts that simply bolt on to the classics are available to keep the younger folks still interested and involved - even though their rides often stray from the original car's design.

As one who also laments, the past, and aging, and diminished cash flow, I am heartened to see the hobby is not dead, albeit a bit shaky in some folk's eyes.  Just be glad we are here is see Darwinism in play - evolution is unstoppable.
Have fun,
Steve B.
S. Butcher

Jay Friedman

I agree with Art: the customs/street rods are winning out as younger folks replace us. 

I just don't understand the mind set and ignore them at car shows.  It's always disappointing when sometimes I'll approach what seems to be a nice Cad or any other make and then that tell-tale modified steering column, chromed engine or some other give-away feature comes into view and I just keep walking.
1949 Cadillac 6107 Club Coupe
1932 Ford V8 Phaeton (restored, not a rod).  Sold
Decatur, Georgia
CLC # 3210, since 1984
"If it won't work, get a bigger hammer."

Walter Youshock

If you're in the minority,  you're not there alone.   I see a far stronger following and desire for original examples or cars refurbished to original appearance.   

I think as the generation is turning,  there is a new appreciation for what the car was new.  People are less likely to re upholster in naugahude and spray over original paint.  That's a step in the right direction.

Authenticity matters.
CLC #11959 (Life)
1957 Coupe deVille
1991 Brougham

Chuck Swanson

Quote from: Jeff Hansen on October 12, 2014, 12:54:56 PM
Traffic was brisk in the CLC tent.  Not many folks had trouble finding our new location.  I worked a shift on Thursday afternoon and another midday Friday; the volume of people was always constant.  I believe I heard Rob Robison indicate we had well over 100 people sign the guest book each day (not everyone does this).  We signed up (or had renew) a number of members including one gentleman from Europe who became a life member on the spot.

Jeff

Not sure how I missed it as I finally walked the entire field at Hershey!  Only my 4th time there.   I arrived w/ RV and trailer Wed night and spent all of Thurs/Friday shopping, and just finished (Sat judging/showing Nova)...but I think you really need 3 days to visit all as some were not open 8-9am, or closed at 4ish. Met some great Caddy vendors and bought many parts.
To confirm, don't you have to be a member for 10 yrs before life member?  Chuck
CLC Lifetime
AACA Lifetime
Like 65-66 Club: www.facebook.com/6566Cadillac
66 DeVille Convertible-CLC Sr Wreath, (AACA 1st Jr 2021, Senior 2022, 1st GN 2022), Audrain Concours '22 3rd in Class.
66 Sedan DeVille hdtp
66 Calais pillar sedan
66 Series 75 9-pass limo
65 Eldorado (vert w/bucket seats)
65 Fleetwood
07 DTS w/ Performance pkg.
67 Chevy II Nova (AACA Sr GN 2018)
69 Dodge Coronet R/T

57eldoking

I went to Hershey for the first time in 1993 at the age of 7, the primary purpose was gathering parts for my dad's 57 Biarritz project. Every October thru the 90's we'd make the long trip from Norway to Hershey to look for parts and bring chrome back and forth as no one could do 50's show chrome in Europe at the time. The early mornings and endless days of trekking the fields at Hershey as a kid was stuff of magic. Getting up early on Saturday and watch the show cars enter the show field are memories that became etched in my mind. Thinking that our project back home could some day be on the level with the cars at the Hershey show field was truly inspiring.

Fast forward to 2006 our Biarritz had been done for 3 years. We had shipped the car back to the states that summer to drive Route 66 from Chicago to Santa Monica. That October we took advantage of having the car still in the states and entered it at the Hershey Fall Meet. Driving our Biarritz onto the showfield at Hershey was an incredible experience and it still gives me goosebumps thinking about it. We spent 4 days cleaning up the car before the show (We'd driven it close to 10k miles since it was done). It did really well and earned a first junior that day.

Today I'm 28 and just bought my own 57 Seville earlier this year. I hope to one day be able to bring this car to Hershey as well. It is sad that for a classic car to be cool in many young peoples' eyes means big wheels, lower stance and "upgraded" mechanicals. I'm a huge advocate of keeping these cars as stock as possible but find that over here in Europe as well most young people prefer the modified look :-\

     

1957 Eldorado Biarritz #906
1957 Eldorado Biarritz #1020 http://bit.ly/1kTvFlM
1957 Eldorado Seville  #1777 http://bit.ly/1T3Uo1c
1995 Fleetwood Brougham  http://bit.ly/20YwJV4
2010 SRX Performance

1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup
1957 Buick Caballero Estate Wagon (x2)
1960 Chevy Apache 10 Stepside
1991 Jeep Grand Wagoneer (x2)
1992 Pontiac Trans Sport GT

joeceretti

#16
I'm 46 and will soon be 47. Just over 1 year ago I stumbled across my 1938 Cadillac and had ZERO idea. I knew nothing, I did have an idea how an internal combustion engine worked. All is not lost fellows.

I, and others my age and much younger, are trying to restore these cars as they should be in recognition of how significant they are for our history.

I also hate to see a beautiful Chevrolet, Chrysler or Ford MANGLED by the "improvement" of adding a mustang front end and Chevy 350 engine and the VERY OBVIOUS and disgusting modern steering column. I do however understand why one would do this, it's easy and relatively cheap.

The problem? Some of the current sellers of the parts I need think that I should be paying for their retirement. I won't simply because I can't. I have two options, keep searching for parts that are more rare than finding a unicorn eating a popsicle in my backyard in the dead of winter or I could just go online and order a pile of parts meant for a hotrod and hack it all together and take pride in "what I did." Then I can drive it around with my obnoxious exhaust and pretend that I have a clue. Not going to happen.

I will continue to search for parts. If anyone has any parts for my 38, let me know. I am on your side. I am not alone.

EDIT: No wonder I become INCENSED when members of the CLC provide help to other members when they want to convert to 12 volt. I am still incensed but am controlling myself. It's not easy.


Chuck Swanson

Joe, in my 40s here too and I believe patience is the key also when restoring these old cars.  If you are in a rush, you can pay higher prices for the parts you need. However, it you wait and take your time, you'll usually find plenty of deals.  It also helps to have multiple cars so if you run into a roadblock with one, you can work on another  :D.   If someone has a part I need and price is way too high, and it's holding up a resto...no worries, I pass, wait for a better deal,  and then work on another car ;)  I also sell Caddy parts, and do most of work myself when I can.  All of my cars are restored to original. 

As an example, I bought a '65 Eldo driver earlier this year with buckets.  I didn't rush to get it ready for the GN and missed bringing the car there, took my time, even though it didn't need many things to be road worthy.  I waited and got some beautiful bumper ends at Hershey.  Also scored an exhaust manifold at a swap meet and a nice fender I needed.  Son and I replaced all the emergency brake cables with new along with a correct ignition key and harness.  I still have to replace an exhaust manifold bolt, but my car gas tank replacement will done tomorrow and the car is drivable (now I can work on the cosmetics).  The guy that helped me with the gas tank, and some welding is in his 20's, and is a fan or original too, so we are out there :) 
CLC Lifetime
AACA Lifetime
Like 65-66 Club: www.facebook.com/6566Cadillac
66 DeVille Convertible-CLC Sr Wreath, (AACA 1st Jr 2021, Senior 2022, 1st GN 2022), Audrain Concours '22 3rd in Class.
66 Sedan DeVille hdtp
66 Calais pillar sedan
66 Series 75 9-pass limo
65 Eldorado (vert w/bucket seats)
65 Fleetwood
07 DTS w/ Performance pkg.
67 Chevy II Nova (AACA Sr GN 2018)
69 Dodge Coronet R/T

Coupe Deville

Quote from: 57eldoking on October 15, 2014, 08:24:04 PM
It is sad that for a classic car to be cool in many young peoples' eyes means big wheels, lower stance and "upgraded" mechanicals.

I'm sixteen so I definitely see that side of young people. Everything has to be new and shiny and have buttons that make noises and lights up and have a touch screen or they wont even look in its direction. Not really any appreciation for older cars anymore from younger people except for "Thats cool". Oh well.
-Gavin Myers CLC Member #27431
"The 59' Cadillac says more about America than a whole trunk full of history books, It was the American Dream"

Dan LeBlanc

Colton is definitely a good kid.  I was very impressed with what he knew.  If he could keep up with Eric, he definitely knows a lot.  It's great too that you're nourishing his sense of curiosity and interest in old cars just as they were.  Kids like him are rare.

I wonder if his parents would trade him for the 12 year old we have, LOL.  Could also throw in the girl to sweeten the deal.
Dan LeBlanc
1977 Lincoln Continental Town Car