66 coupe bought at barrett now on ebay super RARE radio delete!! more BS

Started by wrefakis, February 11, 2016, 10:35:33 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

Scot Minesinger

On the value of 76 Eldorado convertibles, given all things equal I don't think they would be worth more than another year 1971 thru 1975.  The 76 Eldorado convertible probably has a higher average sales price, but that is only because more are in better condition.  More 1976 convertibles are I better condition because twice as many were made as other years and many buyers bought and stored them as an investment, and so many pristine examples exist.  It is all about condition, a 1971 Eldorado in better condition than a 76 will sell for more.  Incidental the 71 is more rare than the 76 of course.

Even if the last Convertible made was a 1976 Cadillac Eldorado I still think condition would be primary value determination. 
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Blade

Scott:

Good points addressed, it's not just about how many were made but how many survived and at the end it all comes to what people are willing to pay for them anyway.

I am, however still disappointed about the crazy prices even 70s muscles pulling in, just saw a 1970 and a 1971 Hemi Cuda Convertible sold on auction for 2.6 and 2.3 millions respectively.   :-\

Anybody knows what the highest price ever paid for a Cadillac was? Just curious ...

Cheers!

Tito Sobrinho

Quote from: Blade on February 14, 2016, 07:48:50 PM
Scott:

Good points addressed, it's not just about how many were made but how many survived and at the end it all comes to what people are willing to pay for them anyway.

I am, however still disappointed about the crazy prices even 70s muscles pulling in, just saw a 1970 and a 1971 Hemi Cuda Convertible sold on auction for 2.6 and 2.3 millions respectively.   :-\

Anybody knows what the highest price ever paid for a Cadillac was? Just curious ...

Cheers!




It is a generation thing! 
Tito S.

1949 CCP 6267X  (First Series)

Thanks to Frank Hershey for its design and thanks to Harry Barr, Ed Cole, John Gordon and Byron Ellis for its engine.

Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

A '76 Eldorado Convertible is probably worth the most of all ELC 1971 - 1976 - all else equal.
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Scot Minesinger

Eric,

You may be right, but given equal condition 1976 Eldorado convertible and another year 1971 thru 1974 I would pay more for another year (1971-1974).  I like the styling and more power of the 71 thru 74 Eldorados over the 75 and 76.  The last year of production, first year of production, a movie star owned it, and etc. mean nothing to me.  It is all about the car itself (style, engine, options, color combo) and condition that establish value to me.

I forgot to add that if 1976 was the last convertible manufactured ever, then convertibles in general which would all be pre 1976 would be worth more.  If someone who might have purchased a brand new Mustang convertible today had to have a convertible, they would have to purchase a classic, which would drive up demand of a very limited supply. 

That is how I got into the hobby, wanted a RWD V-8 American convertible that seated 5 with a/c, tilt, ps, pw, pl, and etc.  Had to go back to 1970 to buy that and so here I am.  If a Crown Vic convertible was offered, that is what I would be driving now and not be in the hobby - or maybe I would have gotten in anyway???
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Caddyholic

Scott

Could you not get those options on a any gm convertible up until 76?
I got myself a Cadillac but I can't afford the gasoline (AC/DC Down Payment Blues)

1961 Series 62 Convertible Coupe http://bit.ly/1RCYsVZ
1962 Coupe Deville

Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

#46
I would just like to add that so-called average prices, "book" values and whatnot are merely a starting point but little more. Variations in condition, colors, mileage, equipment very often result in prices varying in the multiple 100s of percent between the best and the average. And of course is the variable of external market conditions having nothing to do with quality of the cars themselves.

Collector car markets are also a direct indication of the health of the collector car hobby in general which is directly responsible of a wide & vast support network of collector car specialty services, vendors, parts and so on - which is essential to keep these vintage treasures roadworthy and functional. The existence of these industries would be impossible were it not for the interest in the vehicles that depend on them, not to mention the income it provides perhaps millions - directly or indirectly and last but not least, helping inure the hobby from litigation that would destroy it. Don't laugh - it was very close to happening not so long ago.

That said, I would rather see robust collector car values than the other way around, all day, any day. 
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Scot Minesinger

Caddyholic,

True, GM Caprice, Grande Ville, Delta 88 and Le Sabre all offered the RWD American V-8 that seats 6 that I wanted.  However, in researching what car to buy to meet this need, I knew parts would be a big deal.  Cadillac seemed to have the best parts availability and the scissor top is legendary for problems, so went after Cadillac DVC from 1968-1970 to get the 472 high compression engine. 

The other issue with GM full size convertibles from 1971 - 1975 is low power.  While I could get a 455 with the Grand Ville, maybe a Centurian, or a 545/455 option o the Chev/Olds, the more common engine was the 350 w/2bl.  My friend in high school had a 350 2bl in his Caprice, which was in top tune - I drove it and power was just terrible, a shade better than a 1982 Caddy 4.1 in SDV.  The saying can't push its way thru a wet tissue comes to mind.

Classic car buying is more of being ready for an opportunity than a specific model and year search.  Might have had a difficult time turning down a 65 T-bird convertible (had a 65 T-bird in high school) or a 4 door 1961-67 convertible.  As it happened a red 1970 Cadillac DVC came up for sale in November 2005 and I got a good deal on it knowing the convertible season was over.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

veesixteen

If I had the money, I'd rather drive a $50K Cadillac in #2 condition (any model from 1949 to 1970) than a million-dollar "muscle car" trailer queen ! Just sayin' ...
Yann Saunders, CLC #12588
Compiler and former keeper of "The Cadillac Database"
aka "MrCadillac", aka "Veesixteen"

Jeff Rose CLC #28373

Yann,
You hit the nail on the head....... "Drive."
I cant afford better than what I have now, but even if I could I would want something I can drive and enjoy.
Jeff
Jeff Rose
CLC #28373
1970 Coupe DeVille (Big Red)
1955 Series 62 (Baby Blue)
Dad's new 1979 Coupe DeVille

Richard Sills - CLC #936

In the old days, there were people who viewed radios in cars as a distraction to safe driving -- the same way as many now consider cell phones.   They would always have a story about some "kid" who was fiddling with the dial on his radio and ran into another car because he didn't look where he was going.  I think that is why some expensive cars were ordered without a radio, even though the buyer didn't skimp on other options.

The plate that fits where the radio would go is probably a hard-to-find part.  You see them most often in Cadillac professional vehicles, which were more commonly ordered without a radio. 


olds34dude

I bought a 71  Riviera boat tail years ago from an old couple who told me that they had not ORDERED a radio because it was a dangerous device to have in an automobile. Fortunately the buckets , console etc weren't deemed unsafe! Also remember a totally loaded 66  Bonneville, except for a radio- where I grew up in the woods of Vermont, radios were useless in the day, but worked at night! The wonders of AM RADIO! Anyone remember WWVA beaming  a thousand miles north? Dave
D. Varney

cadillac ken

Funny as time marches on and things change...  I was reading the dealers' manual for the 1937 Cadillacs.  It stated when addressing the optional radio that "the myth that a radio is an unsafe distraction to drivers has long since been exploded"-- or some such wording.

So even in 1937 they were addressing the concerns that some buyers would have opting for a radio when ordering their new '37 Caddy.  Maybe why most limos were delivered with the radio delete?  No well to do buyer wanted his Chauffeur distracted!

Evan Wojtkiewicz

You think that a radio delete is a rare option? Have I found a hyper rare '69 DeVille on craigslist for you! You see, it was ordered with a '70 front end! The buyer (possibly Johnny Cash) traveled forward slightly in time to get a '70 front clip for a new '69! Never mind that the front is a different color, that's just another rare two-tone option.

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/cto/5443689102.html

This ad has the trifecta of craigslist phrases including "no low ballers", "rare options", and "restored this car sells for 30,000 +".

Perfect for you, Scott!
CLC 29623

1967 DeVille convertible

Scot Minesinger

Evan,

Thanks I will pass.  This has the look of a parts car more than anything else unfortunately.

Scot
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

cadillac ken

Quote"restored this car sells for 30,000 +".
/quote]

Unfortunately it will take 3x that to restore it.  Completely lost on these guys.

Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

Ordered from the factory with a 1970 front end and a 1969 rear end...

This is a ten-shovel job.  ::)
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Evan Wojtkiewicz

I almost want to call the guy. I'd like to find out if he's just selling the Kool Aid or drinking it too ;D.
CLC 29623

1967 DeVille convertible

tozerco

Quote from: Bob Hoffmann CLC#96 on February 11, 2016, 05:42:50 PM
John,
You've ben sort of quiet lately. Are you going to the meet in Wang? Bringing a car?
Bob

Purely so I can 'fess up BEFORE Bob names and shames me on this Forum, he did catch me superbly with his pretend phone call about military flatheads last week! Sorry I won't be able to return the favour in Wangaratta Bob but hope you thoroughly enjoy your visit anyway!

Regards,
John Tozer
#7946

'37 7513
'37 7533

57eldoking

Quote from: Blade on February 14, 2016, 07:48:50 PM
Scott:

Good points addressed, it's not just about how many were made but how many survived and at the end it all comes to what people are willing to pay for them anyway.

I am, however still disappointed about the crazy prices even 70s muscles pulling in, just saw a 1970 and a 1971 Hemi Cuda Convertible sold on auction for 2.6 and 2.3 millions respectively.   :-\

Anybody knows what the highest price ever paid for a Cadillac was? Just curious ...

Cheers!

Postwar I believe 1957 Eldorado Biarritz #1 is a strong contender which sold for $649,000 back in 2013.

1957 Eldorado Biarritz #906
1957 Eldorado Biarritz #1020 http://bit.ly/1kTvFlM
1957 Eldorado Seville  #1777 http://bit.ly/1T3Uo1c
1994 Seville STS http://bit.ly/1IaOT0c
1995 Fleetwood Brougham  http://bit.ly/20YwJV4

1946 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup
1957 Buick Caballero Estate Wagon (2)
1960 Chevy Apache 10 Stepside
1991 Jeep Grand Wagoneer