Author Topic: Work lights  (Read 2234 times)

Offline TJ Hopland

  • Posts: 10183
Work lights
« on: April 23, 2016, 01:48:56 PM »
What are you all using for work lights for working on and around your car?   

There was a time where I didn't really care if I could see what I was doing and or still could see with a work light shining in my face instead of the work.   Lately I find that I need good light to see what I am doing and having it partially shining in my face just does not work. 

I have a couple styles of Dewalt flashlights that help in some cases but just thinking with all the gadgets out there these days there has to be some better options. 
StPaul/Mpls, MN USA

73 Eldo convert w/FiTech EFI
80 Eldo Diesel
90 CDV
And other assorted stuff I keep buying for some reason

Offline Jay Friedman

  • Posts: 2533
Re: Work lights
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2016, 03:10:47 PM »
For my '49 I use a "trouble light" / "drop light" (or whatever you call it) which has a shield around the bulb so you can point it toward the work and it won't shine back in your eyes.  I have 2 of them which I bought in a local hardware store.  One is plugged in near the front of my car in the garage and the other toward the rear.  I supplement these with a couple of small flashlights for odd corners or when I need an additional light.

I also carry in the car for use on the road a vintage trouble light with a 6 volt bulb that can be plugged into the car's cigarette lighter outlet.
1949 Cadillac 6107 Club Coupe
1932 Ford V8 Phaeton (restored, not a rod).  Sold
Decatur, Georgia
CLC # 3210, since 1984
"If it won't work, get a bigger hammer."

Offline James Landi

  • Posts: 2376
  • 2007 XLR
  • Name: James Landi
Re: Work lights
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2016, 03:21:43 PM »
In a pinch, I use my cell phone light--- sometimes the "flat" flashlight has much more utility, when attempting to check for a leak where only the thinnest "flash light" will squeeze in, and I can hold the top of the phone.  Some of the cheaper l.e.d. drop lights are so glaring and white that they are difficult to work with.  I am also very annoyed with the standard incandescent old style 110 volt bulbs that break the filament with any "drop" of the droplight.  James

Offline chrisntam

  • Posts: 3472
  • Dallas, Texas
  • CLC Number: 29206
  • Name: Chris Jessen
Re: Work lights
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2016, 05:17:32 PM »
 I use a snap on light purchased at Costco.  It has a stand, I can hang it with a coat hanger from the hood or lay it flat on it's back for under car work.  The old "trouble light" just doesn't blow my skirt up any more....
« Last Edit: April 23, 2016, 05:19:09 PM by chrisntam »
1970 Deville Convertible 
Dallas, Texas

Offline Jeff Rose CLC #28373

  • Posts: 2324
  • CLC Number: 28373
  • Name: Jeff Rose
Re: Work lights
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2016, 05:31:03 PM »
Flourescent type drop light. Stays cool and lord knows I have banged it around enough.
If you go with a standard drop light, get a rough service bulb/garage door opener bulb. They take a banging better.
Jeff
Jeff Rosansky
CLC #28373
1970 Coupe DeVille (Big Red)
1955 Series 62 (Baby Blue)
Dad's new 1979 Coupe DeVille

Offline David Greenburg

  • CLC #3830
  • Posts: 1995
  • CLC Number: 3830
  • Name: David Greenburg
Re: Work lights
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2016, 07:28:31 PM »
For general purpose work, I have a tube-type flourescent  drop light on a retractable reel mounted near the garage door so I can use it either in the driveway or in the garage. Safe, and small enough to be useful in tight spaces, including under the dash. For serious surgery I have a cheap 500w halogen work light.
David Greenburg
'60 Eldorado Seville
'61 Fleetwood Sixty Special

Offline NickD

  • Posts: 40
  • Name: N D'Andrea
Re: Work lights
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2016, 05:39:15 AM »
I use what chrisntam uses. I have two of these and they are adequate. I too bought mine at costo, 30.00 each.

Offline TJ Hopland

  • Posts: 10183
Re: Work lights
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2016, 08:17:13 AM »
Are the snap on ones fairly light so you can clamp them to the hood?  Or do you just try to balance them on something under the hood?
StPaul/Mpls, MN USA

73 Eldo convert w/FiTech EFI
80 Eldo Diesel
90 CDV
And other assorted stuff I keep buying for some reason

Offline Scot Minesinger

  • Posts: 6004
Re: Work lights
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2016, 08:22:42 AM »
The best light is moving the car outside on a sunny day - what a difference.

Anyway I use the drop light with a fluorescent bulb and a cage, have several of them.  Also got one of those long LED lights just recently from Eastwood that clamps on either side of the hood, that throws some real good light - works for under dash work too.  Still the drop light is the old reliable.

Will have to check out those snap lights.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline TJ Hopland

  • Posts: 10183
Re: Work lights
« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2016, 08:43:04 AM »
I was wondering about those long ones that clamp on the hood.   

Fluorescent drop light?   Just the classic style with a CFL lamp?   I was thinking of something like that with the cord reel built in just to help get the cord out of the way. 
StPaul/Mpls, MN USA

73 Eldo convert w/FiTech EFI
80 Eldo Diesel
90 CDV
And other assorted stuff I keep buying for some reason

Offline Jay Friedman

  • Posts: 2533
Re: Work lights
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2016, 08:52:37 AM »
Besides my 2 drop lights with "rough service" bulbs, when I do a big job under the car (brakes, r & r transmission, etc.) I have two old desk lamps that stand up on their own.

In addition, I had installed long fluorescent ceiling lamps on either side of my Cadillac's garage space.

Nonetheless, I agree with Scot there is nothing like sunlight on a nice day.
1949 Cadillac 6107 Club Coupe
1932 Ford V8 Phaeton (restored, not a rod).  Sold
Decatur, Georgia
CLC # 3210, since 1984
"If it won't work, get a bigger hammer."

Offline chrisntam

  • Posts: 3472
  • Dallas, Texas
  • CLC Number: 29206
  • Name: Chris Jessen
Re: Work lights
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2016, 09:21:09 AM »
I used a coat hanger bent around the handle of the light to hang it on the hood latch.  It'd be nice if there was a built in hook on it, perhaps the 2017 model.

I've also used 4' LED strip lights (shop light) when working under the car, but it scratches the "top" of the light when sliding it around.

I would consider the Snap on light a "task" light when working under the car
I would consider the Snap On light a light for "general" lighting when working under the hood.  This is because I haven't master the art of being able to "point" it at what I'm working on.

I do have a "trouble light" that I can lay atop what I'm working on.

Funny, I don't recall needing all this light 30 years ago...... ;)
1970 Deville Convertible 
Dallas, Texas

INTMD8

  • Guest
Re: Work lights
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2016, 10:51:53 AM »
My shop has white walls/ceiling/floor and led lighting. Enough reflectivity to see well without a work light.


« Last Edit: April 24, 2016, 10:53:35 AM by INTMD8 »

Offline David Greenburg

  • CLC #3830
  • Posts: 1995
  • CLC Number: 3830
  • Name: David Greenburg
Re: Work lights
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2016, 07:34:02 PM »
The fluorescent drop light I was referring to has a couple of u shaped tubes in it, and is about 10-12" long. I've had it for many years; it predates CFLs. Probably got it from Griots or someplace like that.
David Greenburg
'60 Eldorado Seville
'61 Fleetwood Sixty Special

bill06447

  • Guest
Re: Work lights
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2016, 07:50:20 PM »
I have a rechargeable LED "Nightstick" $36 at Amazon I've had it 3 years so far and it's by far the best work light I've ever owned.

Bill

Offline GBrown #8092

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 318
Re: Work lights
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2016, 07:55:30 PM »
I've got an LED Under hood light. Its not one of the tubes yellow hinged in the middle about 4" wide, got it from Eastwood.
Works great. Just barely long enough to clip on the roof rails of my 72 Fleetwood for interior work.
The one down side is that the light face in when its folded up.
Apparently the manufacturer figured that out as the ones I now see on fee-bay hinge on the side and have little legs that allow them to stand up by them selves.

There is also and LED rough service bulb replacement for the old style drop light, which I have, but have not yet used. Several people here use and really like them.

Offline Scot Minesinger

  • Posts: 6004
Re: Work lights
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2016, 08:24:00 PM »
Jim,

Unless these reflective wall lights are the sun, you are probably young.  Never needed much light until age 50.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline bcroe

  • Posts: 3893
Work lights
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2016, 10:14:29 PM »
I have 4' fluorescents mounted all over, some to shine under the car.  There are
various types from Horrible Fright, pull down fluorescent, rechargeable LED.  If
the car is elevated I use a Dual Head Halogen Shop Light.  Bruce Roe

INTMD8

  • Guest
Re: Work lights
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2016, 10:45:21 PM »
Jim,

Unless these reflective wall lights are the sun, you are probably young.  Never needed much light until age 50.

I'm 38. It's not the sun but it's fairly bright.






Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 12388
  • CLC Number: 18992
  • Name: Bruce Reynolds
Re: Work lights
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2016, 11:04:23 PM »
Show-off.

Bruce. >:D
'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
'02 VX Series II Holden Commodore SS Sedan
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Past Cars of significance - to me
1935 Ford 3 Window Coupe
1936 Ford 5 Window Coupe
1937 Chevrolet Sports Coupe
1955 Chevrolet Convertible
1959 Ford Fairlane Ranch Wagon
1960 Cadillac CDV
1972 Cadillac Eldorado Coupe

 

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