1940 Lasalle Carburetor Bowl Vent Tube

Started by tripwire, July 08, 2018, 04:52:13 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

tripwire

So, the more time I spend with this car the more I learn about it.  My latest discovery came about while I was looking at photos of other Lasalle engines and I noticed a tube attached to the bowl vent on the carburetor.  My car doesn't have this tube. There's a place to screw one into the bowl vent tower but no tube.  I'm sure it should be there should the float were to stick or some other type of failure where gas would overflow from the carb and I don't like the idea of having it dump onto the exhaust manifold or some other hot surface; so far I've been lucky.

I'm sure I can make one but I don't know how or where it ends.  Is it possible someone out there in CLC land can provide some details, a couple of photos or just a description of this pipe?

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Wes in VT

Driving now:
2013 CTS4 Performance Coupe
1940 LaSalle 5229 C4D

A few I used to drive:
1976 Cadillac Ambulance
1969 Cadillac Hearse, Superior Body
1966 Buick Wildcat Hearse
1957 Ford Thunderbird x 3, 1 E code, 2 D code
1956 Oldsmobile Rocket 88 Sedan
1949 Mercury Convertible
1949 Mercury Coupe, Mild Custom
1936 Buick Special Sedan

Bobby B

#1
Quote from: tripwire on July 08, 2018, 04:52:13 PM
  Is it possible someone out there in CLC land can provide some details, a couple of photos or just a description of this pipe?

On the '47 it goes directly back and follows the top of the bell housing and rolls around the driver's side and ends about half way down, aimed at the ground. I know Bill has some Great pictures of the Motor in the bare frame and you might be able to see it a little better.
                        Bobby
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Coupe
1968 Mustang Convertible
1973 Mustang Convertible
1969 Jaguar E-Type Roadster
1971 Datsun 240Z
1979 H-D FLH

Steve Passmore

My earlier engine had the pipe on the right-hand side attached to a clip on the bell-housing. I have seen them end in all different places.   Doesn't really matter as long as it gets that fuel drained out to the road unless you were really pedantic?
Steve

Present
1937 60 convertible coupe
1941 62 convertible coupe
1941 62 coupe

Previous
1936 70 Sport coupe
1937 85 series V12 sedan
1938 60 coupe
1938 50 coupe
1939 60S
1940 62 coupe
1941 62 convertible coupe x2
1941 61 coupe
1941 61 sedan x2
1941 62 sedan x2
1947 62 sedan
1959 62 coupe

tripwire

Thanks guys.   I was thinking along the same lines; just get the gas off the top of the engine and on the ground if a flood event should occur. 

Wes in VT
Driving now:
2013 CTS4 Performance Coupe
1940 LaSalle 5229 C4D

A few I used to drive:
1976 Cadillac Ambulance
1969 Cadillac Hearse, Superior Body
1966 Buick Wildcat Hearse
1957 Ford Thunderbird x 3, 1 E code, 2 D code
1956 Oldsmobile Rocket 88 Sedan
1949 Mercury Convertible
1949 Mercury Coupe, Mild Custom
1936 Buick Special Sedan

Fred Pennington 25635

Wes, you need to route it to the left or drivers side of the car.
The purpose of the tube is to get the fuel away from the exhaust system.
Fred Pennington, CLC 25635
1940, LaSalle 5019
1940 LaSalle 5019 parts car
1968 Ford Bronco
1973 Mustang Convertible
2012 Shelby GT500

Bill Ingler #7799

Here are two pictures that show overflow tube routing. As Fred pointed out, keep the end of the overflow tube on the drivers side and away from the exhaust.   Bill

tripwire

Fred, thanks for the update.  I agree about keeping raw gas away from the exhaust pipe. 
Bill, those are good pictures.  I'm going to keep copies to refer to when I have more questions. Thanks for posting them.

Wes in VT
Driving now:
2013 CTS4 Performance Coupe
1940 LaSalle 5229 C4D

A few I used to drive:
1976 Cadillac Ambulance
1969 Cadillac Hearse, Superior Body
1966 Buick Wildcat Hearse
1957 Ford Thunderbird x 3, 1 E code, 2 D code
1956 Oldsmobile Rocket 88 Sedan
1949 Mercury Convertible
1949 Mercury Coupe, Mild Custom
1936 Buick Special Sedan