Author Topic: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?  (Read 3780 times)

Offline Joe Vastola

  • Posts: 288
  • CLC Number: 29052
Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« on: August 29, 2018, 11:54:52 PM »
Over the last few months I have been doing quite a bit of shopping for a later model (70's or early 80s) Cadillac and it has been surprising how many low mileage, great condition and reasonably priced ($7K - $12K) purchase opportunities are available.  Most model year and drive train combos can be found if you watch the auctions over a two to three week time frame.  My shopping and the excellent selection drove me to make a purchase, and now potentially another.  But it makes me wonder if we are in the last ever, great US collectable car buying era.  A period where the last grouping of affordable and collectable cars are available, specifically Cadillacs, that were extremely well taken care of by original owners, and driven sparingly.  Let's face it, after the later 80s and early 90s, the options for future collectable US cars are slim at best and the numbers of low mileage Cadillacs that were properly serviced and garaged by an original owner will only decrease in the next few years.  Besides Cadillacs, there really is no other large grouping of US car brands/models that were so widely owned and pampered. 

So it really begs the question - Are we living in the last, great collector car buying era?  Or, am I just rationalizing my need to round out the collection with a mid to late 70s CDV?
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 11:57:05 PM by Joe Vastola »

Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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  • Name: Bruce Reynolds
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2018, 12:46:33 AM »
I believe we are.

The problem with cars built after, say 1980, they are so "all the same" and not much variation between models, and makes in a lot of later productions.

Plus, with the proliference of complicated electronics, and the installation of very fine wiring, plus the complicated rubber profiles to hold them together, and stopping leaks, the location of good, rebuildable vehicles will become an impossibility.

I only have to look at the complicated door/window glass rubbers and seals on the Holden and Falcon vehicles here, and know that if they were located in the bush, as I used to find my older cars, they would be staying there.

Bruce. >:D
'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
'02 VX Series II Holden Commodore SS Sedan
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Past Cars of significance - to me
1935 Ford 3 Window Coupe
1936 Ford 5 Window Coupe
1937 Chevrolet Sports Coupe
1955 Chevrolet Convertible
1959 Ford Fairlane Ranch Wagon
1960 Cadillac CDV
1972 Cadillac Eldorado Coupe

Offline D.Smith

  • Posts: 1547
  • CLC Number: 17592
  • Name: Dave Smith
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2018, 08:02:27 AM »
It has passed.  Yes there are plenty of nice cars still out there.  But now that so many people are making a business out of car flipping for profit, it has destroyed the hobby for the average working class guy.    The days of finding a really nice classic car for $3000-$5000 are gone.   Anything in that price range now needs a ton of restoration, or if it is nice it gets snapped up by the flippers and is on there website for $15000-$18000 before they even get it back to their property. 

Offline Big Apple Caddy

  • Posts: 1332
  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2018, 08:35:16 AM »
Maybe.  Maybe not.  The future of collector cars has been wondered about and debated for ages.  People have also been commenting about cars looking too much alike for ages.  None of this is really new.  Classic car enthusiasts especially have long had doubts about new or later model cars of a given era having the same collector appeal that current collector cars of that era have and yet decades later cars from those "doubted" periods find collector interest by the next generation(s).  A good chunk of collector interest has to do with nostalgia and what people connect with and what a 60 year old is nostalgic about today is different than what a 60 year old was nostalgic about decades ago, or what a 60 year old will be nostalgic about decades from now.  It's the ongoing life cycle of the hobby as years, makes, models change, aspects of cars people find appealing can change, how people participate in the hobby can change, etc.

Some quotes from classic car club members in 1955:
“…..they haven't made any classics since the period bounded by 1928 and 1933.  After that, the builders started in with phony streamlining, skirts on fenders, bulbous bodies, superfluous metal.  They covered the radiator with big metal so it wouldn’t cool the car, and shoved it forward of the axle.”

"Modern cars are too full of gadgets, too easy to operate.  It's like sitting in a living room and pushing a button.  We like some movement.  We like the gear shift on the gear box, like the feel of shifting the gears, when you get to know your own transmission."

Years and other aspects change but this general sentiment among classic enthusiasts has continued since and will continue into the future.

Offline Scot Minesinger

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Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2018, 08:57:42 AM »
There are several interesting factors in play on this subject:

1.  The desire for 1980's and 1990's cars.  Everyone says that as time passes merely aging increases the value of them.  That is not true, as I remember what 1980's cars were selling for in 2005 when I bought my 1970 Cadillac.  While the price of my 1970 has gone up at least 50% (worth double what I paid, but I have improved it), it does not seem that the 1980's cars have gone up as much.  Plus most every car made in the 1960's thru 1970's is collectable, whereas this is not true for 1980's and 1990's. 

2.  Younger people are not interested in cars like my generation (I'm 57), the Millennial and Gen Z do not have as much interest in cars.

3.  Many of the wonderful cars out there now are owned by older people that are dying off.  In our local club of 190 or so members, we read of deaths and classic cars going up for sale.  So the hobby is dying a little of attrition.  Then this floods the market with classic cars.  While this has not had much of an impact yet, it will in next decade or so.

4.  Restoring cars of the 1980's and especially of the 1990's is more difficult due to computers and extensive use of plastic.  Plus the cars are worth less, so I see this as a negative for decades of the 1980's and newer restorations.  1980's and up demand for parts has increased for sure.

All this play into I think that now and especially into the future classic cars will start coming down in price.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

  • Posts: 7040
  • Name: Eric DeVirgilis
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2018, 09:23:17 AM »
Over the last few months I have been doing quite a bit of shopping for a later model (70's or early 80s) Cadillac and it has been surprising how many low mileage, great condition and reasonably priced ($7K - $12K) purchase opportunities are available.  Most model year and drive train combos can be found if you watch the auctions over a two to three week time frame.  My shopping and the excellent selection drove me to make a purchase, and now potentially another.  But it makes me wonder if we are in the last ever, great US collectable car buying era.  A period where the last grouping of affordable and collectable cars are available, specifically Cadillacs, that were extremely well taken care of by original owners, and driven sparingly.  Let's face it, after the later 80s and early 90s, the options for future collectable US cars are slim at best and the numbers of low mileage Cadillacs that were properly serviced and garaged by an original owner will only decrease in the next few years.  Besides Cadillacs, there really is no other large grouping of US car brands/models that were so widely owned and pampered. 

So it really begs the question - Are we living in the last, great collector car buying era?  Or, am I just rationalizing my need to round out the collection with a mid to late 70s CDV?

I could not agree more with your observations regarding standard 77-79 RWD models. They change hands today for far less than they did when they were 10 - 15 years old after adjusting for inflation, maybe even before!

The problem is that these cars survived too well compared with the generations on either side of them, albeit for different reasons: Prior to 1977, rust was the issue; after 1980/1981 the issues were driveline related.

In terms of overall usability, utility and serviceablity, this generation is arguably the most tolerable to own in a vintage Cadillac. They can been driven all day effortlessly in comfort on regular unleaded and easier to service than almost anything made prior with a good parts supply for almost anything you could name.   

So to answer your question, my belief is yes, there is not a better time to buy a pristine example of Cadillac from the Tri-7 era. Almost every collectible must go through a period when nobody seems to want it then BAM - prices shoot right through the roof almost overnight. This has occurred many times before and given the Tri7 models have so much to recommend them, it's only a matter of time before the same occurs for these cars too.

So now is the time to place your bets because once the word is out, it'll be too late. By all means, absolutely stick with the finest originals only in the best colors and preferably Coupes.



« Last Edit: August 30, 2018, 12:35:29 PM by Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621 »
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Offline Big Apple Caddy

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  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2018, 10:11:49 AM »
The desire for 1980's and 1990's cars.  Everyone says that as time passes merely aging increases the value of them.  That is not true, as I remember what 1980's cars were selling for in 2005 when I bought my 1970 Cadillac.  While the price of my 1970 has gone up at least 50% (worth double what I paid, but I have improved it), it does not seem that the 1980's cars have gone up as much.  Plus most every car made in the 1960's thru 1970's is collectable, whereas this is not true for 1980's and 1990's. 

Not really an apples to apples comparison as you are looking at the value changes of a car from age 35 to age 48, more in its prime years as far as collector interest, to value changes of decades newer cars that haven't reached their "prime" collector ages yet.

Approximate Hagerty value increases/decreases between September 2009 and May 2018 for:
1970 DeVilles
1970 DeVille Convertible – up 13%
1970 Coupe deVille – up 5%
1970 Sedan deVille – down 2%

35 year old DeVilles (age of your DeVille in 2005)
1983 Coupe deVille – up 47%
1983 Sedan deVille – up 34%

1980s and 1990s cars will have their collectibility time in the sun, so to speak, in the future.


Younger people are not interested in cars like my generation (I'm 57), the Millennial and Gen Z do not have as much interest in cars.

I think the jury is still out on this one:

"Millennials collecting cars with new classics ranging from Datsuns to DeLoreans" --
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/automotive/sc-autotips-0817-millennials-collecting-cars-20170816-story.html

"Actually, we were all wrong – millennials love cars" --
https://www.businessinsider.com/millennials-love-cars-2016-11

"Who says they don't like cars? Millennials are the fastest growing segment of car buyers, according to experts" --
http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/news/millennials-are-fastest-growing-segment-of-car-buyers-article-1.2983590

"Don't Believe the Hype! Cars Matter to Millennials" --
https://www.ally.com/do-it-right/car/dont-believe-the-hype-cars-matter-to-millennials

"Study: Millennials Like Cars More Than Social Media" --
https://www.autotrader.com/car-news/study-millennials-cars-more-social-media-234471

“TC insurance firm's survey finds millennials like cars after all” --
https://www.techcentury.com/2018/06/27/tc-insurance-firms-survey-finds-millennials-like-cars-after-all

"Millennials like buying cars after all" --
https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/30/millennials-like-buying-cars-after-all.html

Offline Eric DeVirgilis CLC# 8621

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Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2018, 10:24:10 AM »
Regarding the reported upsurge in 1983 values - I think is at least partially due to new buyers coming into the market who are unfamiliar with the maladies of the HT4100 models. 
A Cadillac Motorcar is a Possession for which there is no Acceptable Substitute

Offline Dan LeBlanc

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  • Name: Dan LeBlanc
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2018, 10:31:26 AM »
Percentages really mean nothing. 

If the average price of an HT4100 equipped Coupe de Ville over the analysis period was $1000 at the start, a 47% increase makes it a $1470 car, so the actual difference is really much smaller than a 13% gain on a much higher valued car.

It's the actual dollars and cents that mean something - not percentages.
Dan LeBlanc
1977 Lincoln Continental Town Car

Offline Big Apple Caddy

  • Posts: 1332
  • Name: R. Langley
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2018, 12:29:14 PM »
Regarding the reported upsurge in 1983 values - I think is at least partially due to new buyers coming into the market who are unfamiliar with the maladies of the HT4100 models.

Probably true although easy access to forums like this hopefully make consumers more knowledgeable/aware today than during the pre-www days.  At the same time, buyers of collector cars don't tend to focus as much on reliability as they would new or late model cars that are more regularly driven and depended on daily.  Even if they are aware of known potential issues with a collector car, they may figure it's only a weekend/sunny day car, they don't plan to drive it much, all old cars can potentially have problems, etc and will "risk" it.

Of course even if someone expects and is willing to tolerate issues with an old car, their personal negative experiences from back in the day (e.g., a parent or grandparent having a 1983 Cadillac with a HT4100 engine that was nothing but trouble) could easily taint their interest in that car as a collector car today when they might have otherwise sought it out for nostalgic or other reasons.

Offline Big Apple Caddy

  • Posts: 1332
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Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2018, 12:32:40 PM »
Percentages really mean nothing. 

If the average price of an HT4100 equipped Coupe de Ville over the analysis period was $1000 at the start, a 47% increase makes it a $1470 car, so the actual difference is really much smaller than a 13% gain on a much higher valued car.

It's the actual dollars and cents that mean something - not percentages.

The 1983 Coupe and Sedan deVille had a higher "dollar value" increase in over the 1970 Coupe and Sedan deVille as well but more importantly than any of this I think is that we are talking about cars in two different stages of life which isn't really an apples to apples comparison anyway.  Also, if this discussion is about collector cars in general then Cadillac shouldn't be the only focus.

Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2018, 12:57:29 PM »
We continue to hear “prices” or “costs” mentioned in regards to these vehicles. The joy of restoration and enjoyment through driving seems to have taken a back seat. Remember when this club started a 30’s car was only 20 some years old and essentially sry low cost. What their restoration involved was countless hours of painstaking labor and effort to return them to like new condition. Parts hunting was exhausting. No on line catalogs and vendors selling most every conceivable part needed. Many parts were made from scratch again with countless hours of effort. When you think of “collector” cars, exactly what do you mean?
Greg Surfas
Cadillac Kid-Greg Surfas
Director Modified Chapter CLC
CLC #15364
66 Coupe deVille (now gone to the UK)
72 Eldo Cpe  (now cruising the sands in Quatar)
73 Coupe deVille
75 Coupe deElegance
76 Coupe deVille
79 Coupe de ville with "Paris" (pick up) option and 472 motor
514 inch motor now in '73-

Offline Joe Vastola

  • Posts: 288
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Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2018, 05:13:29 PM »
For me its simple - 1) a collector car is one with a style that defines a time, and 2) has the potential to meet some, or all, of the elements that make this hobby great.  Elements including but not limited to: pride of ownership, nostalgia, interest in restoration, mechanical enjoyment, appreciation, and of course investment.  We all have varying requirements, interests and tastes that are satisfied with ownership of a piece of automotive history and I don't think the modern vehicle that started to develop from the late 80's to today, even some Cadillac's of the period, can fulfill #2 above.  The streamlined generic look of currently sold models models may even have a problem satisfying #1.

The days of finding a really nice classic car for $3000-$5000 are gone.   Anything in that price range now needs a ton of restoration, or if it is nice it gets snapped up by the flippers and is on there website for $15000-$18000 before they even get it back to their property. 

When it comes to lower cost options, I think they can still be found.  Case in point is this example from another post in the forum.  We could debate our individual view of what "really nice" means, but I would not consider this example to be in need of significant restoration.  To bad I'm not closer to Minnesota to take a look.  A nice collectible low mileage Cadillac with a low price. 

https://rmn.craigslist.org/cto/d/79-cadillac-coupe-de-ville/6675168843.html
« Last Edit: August 30, 2018, 06:03:46 PM by Joe Vastola »

Offline novetti

  • Posts: 90
  • Name: Julio Novetti
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2018, 08:37:50 PM »
I think one of the biggest challenges to the younger generations in getting involved with classic cars is how distant they are from the hand skills required to restore/maintain/keep them running.

The older people grew up with family vehicles with a lot less technology and reliability, so from early age we got used to changing tires, running out of batteries, push starting, some rust around etc etc. I started wrenching from a very early age.  Also the younger generations are extremelly risk adverse. Cars without factory fitted seatbelts? Geez the other day I was overhearing some kids in the office discussing which car was safer by the multiple number of Airbags (2 is not enough must have 6 or 8 !!).

The modern vehicles that appeal to the youngsters are virtually unserviceable by the owner and also by the mechanic around the corner (bmw's mercs etc come to my mind).

If you buy a Mercedes and mice chew two wires from the harness it can be almost impossible to fix it. It just happened to my brother's 2008 model.

I still believe some youngers will get classic cars, but will be from, 80's or older. Anything post 2000 is impossible to restore (re electronics) and some Mechanical parts (diesel turbo engines with plastic intake systems?  :o). They are throw away vehicles and no better than the electricals that are just around in the corner...
54' Iris Blue (Preservation)
54' Cabot Gray (Restoration)
58' Lincoln Continental Convertible (Restoration)
58' Ford Skyliner (Preservation)

Offline Greg Powers

  • CLC#19551
  • Posts: 299
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2018, 09:16:26 PM »
Who knows, only time will tell. I think as was stated earlier, comparing overall percentage of price increase over a period of time may not tell the whole story. A Cadillac that was selling at $1000 and now $1200 is a nice percentage increase but may just simply be reflecting inflation over a period of time. I'm afraid that there are not going to be a lot of 1980's and forward Cadillacs surviving well after 50 or 60 years due to the trouble prone engines (HT4100 and NorthStar), the amount of outdated electronics and the amount of composite materials that age poorly. On the subject of future values, as we all know something is really only worth what someone is willing to pay. The current generation lives in a disposable world. They look for the newest and latest concepts in all areas of their lives. Few want to be bothered with the things that used to be collected to bring people pleasure. If you don't believe me go to an estate sale and see what none of the family wants to keep. Everything from china and silver to collector cars are sold quite often because no in the family has any desire to keep them. If this becomes a trend you may see a drop in the value of collector cars due to lack of interest from a new buying public.  I guess all we can do is continue to promote the hobby and wait to see what happens. - Greg   
G.L. Powers>1954 Series 62 Sedan/1958 Fleetwood 60 Special-sold/1963 Series 62 Convertible-sold/1970 Fleetwood Brougham-sold/1994 Fleetwood Brougham/1971 Sedan Deville-sold/2000 Deville-sold/2001 DTS-sold/1976 Eldorado Convertible-sold/1983 Coupe Deville-sold/1990 Allante-sold/1990 and 1991 Brougham deElegance-sold/1992 Brougham-sold/Always looking!

Offline Scot Minesinger

  • Posts: 6004
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2018, 09:50:39 PM »
Well I do agree those 1977-79 Cadillacs are undervalued.  My best friend's Dad had a brand new 1978 Cadillac when I was in high school. It was fast and cool.  He also owned a 1977 Cadillac too and bought a brand new car every year.  He said the 1977 was faster than the 78.  He opted for the Lincoln in 1979 (last of the big ones) which with a 400 engine was slow as a VW, big mistake - he should have bought the 1979 Cadillac with the performance rear axle.  The 1977 - 79 Cadillacs were powerful and cool.

You can get statistics to support anything, and most everyone reading this would rather drive a 1972 Cadillac than a 1982, and would rather restore a 1971 all metal Cadillac than a 1987 DeVille due to plastic and computer parts. 
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

Offline The Tassie Devil(le)

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  • Name: Bruce Reynolds
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2018, 10:20:24 PM »
As has been said many times, there are Statistics, and Damn Statistics.

As a Treasury person said to me one day, any statistics can be screwed around to get what the person desires to read from those statistics.

I too, personally would prefer to restore a '72 than an '82, or '92, or '02.

Actually, I would prefer to restore any vehicle with no plastic (or bakelite) at all.

Bruce. >:D

'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
'02 VX Series II Holden Commodore SS Sedan
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Past Cars of significance - to me
1935 Ford 3 Window Coupe
1936 Ford 5 Window Coupe
1937 Chevrolet Sports Coupe
1955 Chevrolet Convertible
1959 Ford Fairlane Ranch Wagon
1960 Cadillac CDV
1972 Cadillac Eldorado Coupe

Offline 64\/54Cadillacking

  • Posts: 798
  • Name: C.Asaro
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2018, 10:39:02 PM »
Well I do agree those 1977-79 Cadillacs are undervalued.  My best friend's Dad had a brand new 1978 Cadillac when I was in high school. It was fast and cool.  He also owned a 1977 Cadillac too and bought a brand new car every year.  He said the 1977 was faster than the 78.  He opted for the Lincoln in 1979 (last of the big ones) which with a 400 engine was slow as a VW, big mistake - he should have bought the 1979 Cadillac with the performance rear axle.  The 1977 - 79 Cadillacs were powerful and cool.

You can get statistics to support anything, and most everyone reading this would rather drive a 1972 Cadillac than a 1982, and would rather restore a 1971 all metal Cadillac than a 1987 DeVille due to plastic and computer parts.


Statistically speaking yes, but personally? I’d rather own a 77-79 Brougham instead!! Much nicer looking and quality interior over the 72, and even looks wise I prefer the 77-79 just because the Cadillac of this era was well thought out and very lavishly detailed with ornamentation which I love.

I used to own a 72 Sedan Deville and besides for the 472 and wonderful driving dynamics, the interior was very plain and cheaply made.

So I believe it really depends on the year. Not every old Cadillac will be worth all that much for the sake of it being a classic.

Now on the other hand, the majority  of all 50’s Cadillacs in decent looking, to restored condition, the price range for these cars is astronomical!!

60’s Caddy’s are still obtainable price wise for some people, but they too are becoming pretty pricey for a beginner Cadillac enthusiast to buy and fix up.

I know for a fact that I wouldn’t be able to buy my 64 in 2018 in its current condition now. It’s value has easily gone up a few grand within 4 years.

Speaking of 80’s Cadillacs, I might be buying an 87 Brougham this weekend! I have always loved the D’Elegance interiors of them and honestly feel like they are one of nicest looking and feeling interiors Cadillac made besides for the 66 on down Cadillacs.

I truly believe after 92, Cadillacs became extremely  bland, too modern and plastic ridden cars. More so than than the 80’s years. Thus not making them collector car worthy especially since they lost their traditionally styled Brougham after 92.

As a Millennial, nobody I know either from work, through friends or even generally out in public owns old Cadillacs, every car show I’ve been to that has Cadillacs there, every owner is in his 50’s on up. So I can’t see our Cadillac hobby surviving another 2 generations.

Not even Millennials are into old Cadillacs, and the younger Gen before me won’t even know what a Cadillac is lol. The only thing that will make prices up I feel is the rarity of the make and model. Supply and demand is at play here as well. All it will take is for a remake or sequel to Goodfellas to come out that will showcase a bunch of old Cadillacs to the younger generation which will help spark their interests and desire to owning one that could help matters and possibly make our cars more valuable to the masses.
1964 Sedan Deville (Own)
1987 Brougham D’Elegance (Sold)
1954 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special
1994 Fleetwood Bro (Sold)
1972 Sedan Deville (Sold)
1968 Coupe Deville (Sold)
1978 Lincoln Continental (Own)
1979 Lincoln Mark V Cartier (Own)

Offline StevenTuck

  • Posts: 1055
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  • Name: Steven M. Tuck
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2018, 06:25:58 AM »
The topic has been discussed in the past and this is my theory. Foremost there has to be interest in collecting a vehicle. The current generation, with some very few exceptions, has no interest in collecting a vehicle. The reason is they have no personal connection to a vehicle.

I recently watch a interview with Bill Clinton and George Bush who seem to be more friends now than rivals. Bill, a baby boomer, said he is one of the few alive who didn't grow up with a TV, as such the family had to communicate. The only communication todays generation knows is via a cell phone and texting, facebook and twitter. The personal connection between two humans is lost.

Unlike our generation, they can communicate with someone by cell phone, no need to drive over to a friends house to visit. I discovered this first hand with my niece who opted to text her boyfriend rather than go out on a date. A date that would require a vehicle to get them there.

Proof is in the pudding they say and about five years ago for the first time ever the number of sixteen year olds getting their drivers license had dropped. The interest in driving a vehicle is waning. Therefore, the current generation views a vehicle as utilitarian much like a refrigerator. It is something that they have that makes life easier. It serves that purpose and nothing more. So do you think people will be collecting refrigerators? I think not.

Today's cars sitting in a junk yard for 20 years will probably have little decay since most today are not even made out of steel. However, as we discovered with the late 70s, the plastics suffer most decay. Computers will probably be useless. Restoration will be very difficult.

I think the clubs like ours and other marques will be much smaller. Today the baby boomers drive collecting for the most part. Once we die off, the new generation's interest is more into their cell phones than cars. Cell phones are their ticket to freedom unlike what cars which were ours when we could first drive. The rice burners will be all the rage and they are gaining momentum now. I am glad I won't be around to see it to be honest.
1962 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz
http://bit.ly/1NfPNHE
Car Show Signs and Car Photo Books
http://carshowsigns.net/

Offline jdemerson

  • 1952 Cadillac 6219X Vermont -- Emerson
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  • CLC Number: 26790
  • Name: John D Emerson
Re: Are we living in the last, best collector car buying era?
« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2018, 08:13:08 AM »

Statistically speaking yes, but personally? I’d rather own a 77-79 Brougham instead!! Much nicer looking and quality interior over the 72, and even looks wise I prefer the 77-79 just because the Cadillac of this era was well thought out and very lavishly detailed with ornamentation which I love.
...

Now on the other hand, the majority  of all 50’s Cadillacs in decent looking, to restored condition, the price range for these cars is astronomical!!

60’s Caddy’s are still obtainable price wise for some people, but they too are becoming pretty pricey for a beginner Cadillac enthusiast to buy and fix up.

Speaking of 80’s Cadillacs, I might be buying an 87 Brougham this weekend! I have always loved the D’Elegance interiors of them and honestly feel like they are one of nicest looking and feeling interiors Cadillac made besides for the 66 on down Cadillacs.

....

I truly believe after 92, Cadillacs became extremely  bland, too modern and plastic ridden cars. More so than than the 80’s years. Thus not making them collector car worthy especially since they lost their traditionally styled Brougham after 92.
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I'm an optimist about the old-car hobby and its future. I've attended four Vermont shows in the past year, and helped put on two of them. All were well-attended, and there were plenty of young people (including couples with school-age kids). They were interested in more than small Japanese and Korean makes. Of  course they did not own old Cadillac, Packards, Lincolns, Imperials, Duesenbergs, or Pierce Arrows. But some of then owned 50s and 60s Chevys, Fords, Mopars. And many of the youngest men attending did have modified Hondas, Toyotas, Nissans, and Mazdas. Interests (and affordability) shift, but the interest in the old car hobby is still there, smart phones not withstanding!

Back to Cadillacs. For 1950s models, the prices of convertibles and nice Coupe DeVilles may be "astronomical", but what about Series 61 and Series 62 Sedans from 1950-1956 or so? If the prices are that high, make me as offer and I'll consider moving up to a 1979 Fleetwood! The point here is that it depends heavily on the model, and also of course the show-quality condition. The majority of people who actually had new or almost-new Cadillacs in their families in the 50s and 60s had lowly sedans.

Mr. Asaro, Eric DeVirgilis, Scot Minesinger, and several others have often pointed to the '77-'79 rear-drive Cadillac as especially desirable models that are still reasonably affordable. I agree! I once purchased a 1977 Chevrolet Caprice, a LOADED demo, for an uncle who was car shopping. It was a terrific car, even after 10 years driving in Upstate New York. Of course a Cadillac of the same era with the 425 stood way above the Caprice! Even at the same price and condition, I'd choose a '79 Fleetwood or Coupe over a '71-'76 model. But of course this is exceedingly subjectively. And if you go back to 1968-1970 it becomes (for me) a tougher call, and affordability becomes part of the equation.

What about newer models? The 1980s RWD big cars had the 368. I'll skip V8-6-4 and the 4100s. But the rear-drive Broughams with 305 or 350 up to 1992 always seem very classy to me. Other than the drive train, I wonder just how different the 1990 to 1992 Broughams are from the 1977-79 generation. To my eye, all of these models are especially attractive.

As for the 1987 Brougham D'Elegance, has anyone put a 425 in it, or is that prohibitively expensive or technically almost impossible? What about a Chevrolet 350? I've been amazed at what a clever 82-year-old gentleman recently did with a 1949 Series 61 Coupe; it looks authentic on the outside yet he is driving a relatively modern car and he drove it from VT to FL last winter. It seems anything is possible. It's not my thing, but to each his/her own...

The challenges in restoring the more recent models with their electronics and microprocessors may mean that all-original "preservation-class" cars will be especially highly valued by future collectors. And if 3-D printing technology can already make guns, will it eventually meet the need for replacement parts on, say, 1990s models?

John Emerson
1952 Cadillac sedan 6219X


John Emerson
Middlebury, Vermont
CLC member #26790
1952 Series 6219X
http://bit.ly/21AGnvn

 

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