1941 4-Door. Looking for advice

Started by marcd96, February 23, 2021, 10:00:34 AM

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marcd96

Hello All - I am brand new to the group and to the cadillac world.  I just came into possession of a 1941 cadillac 4-door sedan.  I don't know much other than the fact that this vehicle drove into the storage facility 8 years ago.  I am looking for advice on how to proceed.  The 1st thought is to find a reputable cadillac restoration expert and send it out to have a full resto, or to sell it as is.  It seems like there are tons of useful parts.  Floor and doors are pretty rusted/rotted. 

Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Cadman-iac

That's a beautiful car, it would be a shame to part it out. You could do some of the work yourself to save money, if you are so inclined.
I don't know who you might take it to for restoration work, but there's many people here that can advise you on that.
Welcome to the club, and please post more pictures of the car, the rust damage pictures would help for others to recommend remedies.

Rick
1956 Coupe Deville A/C car "Norma Jean"

marcd96

thanks for the response.  I will be adding more pictures of the interior, engine bay and undercarriage a little later today.  I also forgot to mention that I am in Pennsylvania.


Cadman-iac

 I look forward to seeing more of it. I'm in Arizona,  so probably not much help with a restoration shop.
1956 Coupe Deville A/C car "Norma Jean"

harry s

Marc, Welcome to the forum and congrats on your new acquisition. It looks like a '41 67 Series. You can confirm by the data plate on the driver side cowl behind the hood hinge. The model # should be 67** with the last two numbers indicating whether limo (33), five passenger (19), etc. The reality of restoring a car in that condition would be an expensive experience that would greatly exceed the market value, especially in the sluggish pre War market. I certainly don't want to dampen your enthusiasm just trying to be real. Please show us some more pictures.  Where in PA are you?      Harry
Harry Scott 4195
1941 6733
1948 6267X
2011 DTS Platinum

Bill Ingler #7799

Marc: I second with Harry on that this car would be a very expensive car to restore. The market and car values for these 40s Cadillacs has dropped and I do not see a turn around in this market. If this car is restored, the owner, prior to starting any restoration ,should take inventory of what parts are needed as some parts for 40 Cads are next to impossible to find. I have been down the full restoration road with a 41-60S and a 47-62-convert.  Bill

marcd96

thank you for the response.  Through this venue and researching elsewhere, I am definitely learning that this resto may not be worth it.  I am leaning towards selling this as is, as there are many useful parts available. 

marcd96

here is the information on the tag

Barry M Wheeler #2189

Marc, you have the most common of the four body types. I have owned two of these. One was the 6733I with an Imperial division window. The second was the five passenger division (no jump seats) of which there were only 95 built. I do not have readily at hand how many of your style were built, but believe it to be in the 300 units made. This car would have been used by a person of means that wanted lots of room, or had a family that wandered around in the back seat. (Back in the days when seat belts were unheard of.)

It has the wrong skirts is the most glaring thing. (Just so you'll "know," Harry S also has one of these... So he knows what he's talking about.) Best of luck.
Barry M. Wheeler #2189


1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville

35-709

Interesting car --- the most glaring thing to me is that it has no less than 4 outside rearview mirrors on the left side!  Not to mention at least 3 on the passenger side.  Plus it appears to have an SO interior from the plate.   :)
1935 Cadillac Sedan resto-mod "Big Red"
1973 Cadillac Caribou - Sold - but still in the family
1950 Jaguar Mark V Saloon resto-mod - Sold
1942 Cadillac 6269 - Sold
1968 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
1935 Glenn Pray - Auburn Boattail Speedster, Gen. 2

The Tassie Devil(le)

You have to remember that this was before the days of rear-vision cameras. ;)

Or multiple drivers with short arms so each pair is set correct for each driver?

Bruce. >:D
'72 Eldorado Convertible (LHD)
'70 Ranchero Squire (RHD)
'74 Chris Craft Gull Wing (SH)
'02 VX Series II Holden Commodore SS Sedan
(Past President Modified Chapter)

Past Cars of significance - to me
1935 Ford 3 Window Coupe
1936 Ford 5 Window Coupe
1937 Chevrolet Sports Coupe
1955 Chevrolet Convertible
1959 Ford Fairlane Ranch Wagon
1960 Cadillac CDV
1972 Cadillac Eldorado Coupe

35-709

Maybe the P.O. was an illegal whiskey runner and wanted to keep a close watch behind for the law.  Or possibly wanted to see where he had been as well as where he was going --- aka a History major.   ;D
1935 Cadillac Sedan resto-mod "Big Red"
1973 Cadillac Caribou - Sold - but still in the family
1950 Jaguar Mark V Saloon resto-mod - Sold
1942 Cadillac 6269 - Sold
1968 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
1935 Glenn Pray - Auburn Boattail Speedster, Gen. 2

Chris Cummings

That's a marvelous car!  Lots of personality (especially the rakish radio antenna on the right rear fender ;).

The Series 67 was a second limousine line in 1941-46 as a Fisher-bodied alternative to the Series 75.  Series 67 was more contemporary and Series 75 was more traditional/formal.

Congratulations, and good luck!

Chris Cummings


marcd96

thanks for all the feedback. i'm wondering if there is a way to try and start this car without the key.  any ideas?

jaxops

Wow- it looks like a "Dick Tracy" police car, especially from the back.  I have a fellow that is restoring my 1949 limousine here in Norfolk.  I have the pictures on the Restoration section.  We're doing it a little at a time.  I would say, make it safe, and driveable with good brakes. Then enjoy it for a while.  Just an opinion.
1970 Buick Electra Convertible
1956 Cadillac Series 75 Limousine
1949 Cadillac Series 75 Imperial Limousine
1979 Lincoln Continental
AACA, Cadillac-LaSalle Club #24591, ASWOA

Bobby B

Quote from: marcd96 on March 24, 2021, 01:51:49 PM
thanks for all the feedback. i'm wondering if there is a way to try and start this car without the key.  any ideas?

Does it still have the factory coil on it with the cap at the base, or did someone change it to an exposed, more modern 2 terminal coil where the + and - terminals are exposed?
                           Bobby
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Coupe
1968 Mustang Convertible
1973 Mustang Convertible
1969 Jaguar E-Type Roadster
1971 Datsun 240Z
1979 H-D FLH

James Landi

Starting without the key is relatively simple-- as noted above.  If you have no understanding of electricity or gasoline engines, you'd best leave it alone until you find someone who will devote some time to helping you or you simply sell it as is.  With a long dormant engine, the "starting" is an important "process," and simply stated, getting a new battery and attempting to crank it over and get it started is usually a HUGE error.   DO you have any verified facts regarding the last time the engine was run?--- that makes a HUGE difference as well. If it's been stored inside, and been run in the last five years, you're likely at a much easier  starting (pun intended) point, then, let's say, "It hasn't been started since stored 45 years ago."    The details regarding starting a long dormant engine of this vintage can be provided by members of the forum--- you need to provide a couple of details that will be helpful for your decision.  1. If you have no knowledge about mechanics, then better to sell it to someone here who will devote hundreds of hours to resurrect it.  2. If you have any information about the last time it was on the road, and/or the last time the engine was running, that is key information to make a decision at your end and a potential purchaser. Help abounds here, so take some pictures and keep posting information.   James

Bobby B

I agree with James here, because there were a few times I purchased a vehicle that an anxious seller tried to start it and did more damage than good. This scenario led to issues in less than 3 months down the line. I've resurrected vehicles that were sitting 35+ years, but it takes some knowledge and caution when doing so, along with some background of how it was stored. It's not an easy process depending on some facts and your own mechanical abilities and knowledge of internal combustion engines. Best left alone. It's really not going to change the selling price as people will know what they're getting into anyway when they see it. I've stopped many sellers from trying to start something just because I showed up to look. It's not a smart move. More bad than good will usually come out of it.....
                             Bobby
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Coupe
1968 Mustang Convertible
1973 Mustang Convertible
1969 Jaguar E-Type Roadster
1971 Datsun 240Z
1979 H-D FLH

cadillac ken

Cool looking Caddy.  But as far as a restoration goes, well, as with all cars it will cost exponentially more than the value of the car.  You may want to do as one post suggests: just get it running, do the brakes, the lines, the fuel tank and lines, be sure the radiator is good...
well as you can see that alone will take some investment. Also the cloth covered wiring is probably losing it's insulation and may be a problem-- and a fire hazard.

Sorry I don't mean to throw cold water on anyone's enthusiasm but a careful consideration of what's involved can save you from going down a path that would not end well. 

If you can do the above yourself and get it running then have at it. Enjoy it for what it is. 

Best of luck, Ken