1947 Fleetwood 60 Special -Rear Axle

Started by isuras2, December 02, 2021, 12:43:49 PM

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isuras2

I just received a 1947 Fleetwood 60 Special.  It's in pretty good shape, but hasn't been started in 50 years.  My plan is to methodically go through the engine and fuel system to get it running, then brakes and transmission, then lights.  Then just enjoy it. 
Any suggestions as to what to look out for or pointers would be greatly appreciated.
TIA,
Robert
R. Swerczek
'47 Fleetwood Sixty Special

TJ Hopland

If it hasn't even turned over yet I would put extra time into pulling the spark plugs and getting some lube down the cylinders and pulling the valve covers to possibly try and get some lube down the valves and making sure none are stuck before you try and turn it over.    If its been turned then any damage to the valve train is already done.

Early Hydromatic guys will have to chime in with the best way to handle that but my guess is it needs to come apart before you really try to drive the thing.   All the soft parts will be shot just from age.  Soft parts are still available, hard parts are hard to come by and expensive if you can find them so you don't want to risk damaging any of those.

Does the brake system still have fluid in it?  Or was it more or less empty and blown lines?   IF the system was empty or open anywhere you will likely have to replace the hard lines too. 

What sort of quality car are you going for here?   Seems like it going to need a lot of stuff so deciding now if its going to be more of a driver resto mod sort of thing or pretty original will be important.   I don't know much about that era car but I assume there are possible options for 'upgrading' some things to easier to find and maintain parts that will also make it a better driving car if you plan to drive it a lot.    Having a plan going in will help because there may be things that will have to come apart to access other things that will make it easier to swap or convert other things.   
StPaul/Mpls, MN USA

73 Eldo convert w/FiTech EFI
80 Eldo Diesel
90 CDV
And other assorted stuff I keep buying for some reason

toybox

    Hello , By now you have probably started the process so I'm just going to hit the high points.  ATF/accetone 50/50 mix about 1/4 cup down each spark plug hole. Let it sit for at least one week. This will help free up your rings in there groves.  Remove the belts and spin the water pump , fan and gen. If they spin free and smooth lube them and replace the belt. If they don't spin or feel rough when they do leave the belts off and continue . After the cocktail has been in the cylinders for about a week place a socket and breaker bar on the big bolt in the middle of the lower pulley and try turning it clockwise looking at it from the front of the car. If it turns easy your in good shape, if not I would recommend pulling and dismantling the engine for inspection. Next  jack up the car and pull the oil pan , clean it  and the pickup screen good as well.You would not believe what you can find in there. Reassemble add oil and new points condenser and plugs.  Throw a hot battery in it pour a little gas down the carb stand back and push the button. If it starts for a few seconds great ,(ti will  stop and flush the cooling system fill it with fresh water check it for leaks.  After that it's all about making it run better. As for the trans just make sure it has fluid in it and check it again after it's running.(if your trans just has drive and low for forward gears , ALWAYS put it in drive for a moment before putting in revers) I have used this  to several old cars with flat head engines that had set for decades and they all ran. Some however were parked because they were worn out or had other issues but this will tell you what you have to work with. After doing this to my 46 Cadillac we drove it for two plus years before  I rebuilt the engine. Do you have any history on the car? It can help in deciding what to check and be concerned about. Best of luck and keep us posted on your progress . Tim

wheikkila

I would like to add a few things. While you have the oil pan off. I would pull some main and rod caps. I would look for ware and check clearance with plastigage. I would also squirt oil up on the cam as much as I could. Then I would pull the distributor tube and prime the oil system. You have a lot of oil line in this engine. You want oil there as soon as you can get it. After everything is back together except installing the plugs. Be sure to put oil back in it! Disconnect the power to the coil. This is when you want to turn the engine over in short bursts. 5 or 10 seconds at a time. After three turns stop and let the starter cool off. You can squirt some more oil down the cylinders between cranking.  I would do this process 5 times. Doing this helps lube the engine along with reseating the valves. Then connect the power to the coil and plugs to the wires. Have someone crank it over so you can see that each plug if firing. Then install the spark plugs. Just before you start the cranking process. Hook up a fuel can to the fuel pump. You can be priming the fuel system at the same time. If it don't prime up. You can use a small electric fuel pump. Most electric fuel pumps will work on 6 volt power. I know this sounds like a lot. But it will give the engine a good chance. I did this to mine and I got four years out of it. The engine always smoked and never got better. After I tore mine down I found that the number 8 piston had broke as some point and gouged the cylinder.    Good luck Wayne       

toybox


isuras2

Thank you all.  I currently have it running.  I'm rebuilding the brake system now, then replace transmission and differential fluid, rebuild the fuel pump and replace fuel line and should be good.
R. Swerczek
'47 Fleetwood Sixty Special

Bill Ingler #7799

Your car probably has the original rear axle bearings and should be changed. As I posted in 2017, I have been on several CCCA tours where a couple of 47s caught fire because their rear axle bearings froze from lack of lubrication. Well worth your time and money to pull the rear axles and replace with new sealed bearings.    Bill

isuras2

I'll have to change them out.  Thanks for the info.  It helps.
R. Swerczek
'47 Fleetwood Sixty Special

isuras2

Quote from: Bill Ingler #7799 on December 19, 2021, 12:12:04 PM
Your car probably has the original rear axle bearings and should be changed.
...
Well worth your time and money to pull the rear axles and replace with new sealed bearings.

To remove the axle shaft, I just pull it out?  The shop manual says to "use tool J-838".  I'm assuming this is just a slide hammer type of tool?  And it should just "pop" then be able to be pulled out?
R. Swerczek
'47 Fleetwood Sixty Special