Author Topic: Rain Sensor Wipers AT THE Car Wsah  (Read 2807 times)

Dick Heller

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Rain Sensor Wipers AT THE Car Wsah
« on: February 21, 2005, 08:48:53 PM »
At our local ½ mile long full window view car wash, I watched in amassment as a Lexus had its wipers mangled by the washing strips as it went down the soapy lane.  The car wash warns about everything, (e.g., windows/sunroof open, antennas, non-folding mirrors), but no warning about rain sensor wipers!  Its standard practice to keep the car in neutral with the ignition in the accessory position.

Another thing to be careful about is automatic door lock feature and getting locked out at the end of the car wash.  Disengage the feature, carry an extra key fob or make sure your On*Star subscription is current.
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densie

  • Guest
Re: Rain Sensor Wipers AT THE Car Wsah
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2005, 06:29:09 PM »

  I cant decide if I want a 72-76 New Yorker or a 70-74 Fleetwood.

  But I definitely know what I dont want!

-densie

David #19063

  • Guest
Cars
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2005, 06:38:04 PM »
Denise,

Why not add the 69-71 NYRs, Imperials, and Imperial LeBarons, and 300s?

Are you looking for a 2D, 4DHT, or 4D sedan?

David

Johnny

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Go for the 76 Fleetwood
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2005, 10:00:34 PM »
Quote from: densie

  I cant decide if I want a 72-76 New Yorker or a 70-74 Fleetwood.

  But I definitely know what I dont want!

-densie


Look for a 76 Fleetwood and have one of the last of the big ones.

Dick Heller

  • Guest
Re: Go for the 76 Fleetwood
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2005, 07:36:54 AM »
Agree with Johnny, nice 4 door Fleetwood with all options including the fireman sized power Astroroof.  Astroroofs back then complied with all building code regulations.

Dick

densie 20352

  • Guest
Re: Cars
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2005, 07:34:05 PM »

  I love 4-door sedans.  It seems to me that the 70s cars have a better and quieter ride than the 60s vintage, but of course I havent driven them all.

-densie

densie

  • Guest
Re: Go for the 76 Fleetwood
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2005, 07:45:57 PM »

  The only problem with a 76 is that you have to have a catalytic convertor, which is why I stopped at 74.  A cat makes your floorboards rust out, makes the floor hot on the passenger side, which is bad for people like me who ride with no shoes on, and Im always worried that its going to start a fire if I park in the grass.  Lawn care just really isnt our thing.  ;)

   I have a 76, its a commercial chassis with leaf springs, so it doesnt ride quite as well as the Fleetwoods, but much better than the new ones do.  And oh, the power steering.  You can steer it with your tongue.

   Not that I do that, but isnt it nice to know that you can?

-densie

Joe

  • Guest
Re: If going for Big Car Comfort....
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2005, 11:43:06 PM »
Ive had 70s Caddies and New Yorkers. The Most comfortable seats Ive ever had in ANY car were in the78 New Yorker Brougham. Pillowed soft Corinthian Leather. Adjustable any which way. Although they were comfortable, I always felt kind of guilty; not knowing how many Corintians they had to skin for my seats.

Johnny

  • Guest
Re: Go for the 76 Fleetwood
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2005, 12:26:17 AM »
Quote from: densie

  The only problem with a 76 is that you have to have a catalytic convertor, which is why I stopped at 74.  A cat makes your floorboards rust out, makes the floor hot on the passenger side, which is bad for people like me who ride with no shoes on, and Im always worried that its going to start a fire if I park in the grass.  Lawn care just really isnt our thing.  ;)

   I have a 76, its a commercial chassis with leaf springs, so it doesnt ride quite as well as the Fleetwoods, but much better than the new ones do.  And oh, the power steering.  You can steer it with your tongue.

   Not that I do that, but isnt it nice to know that you can?

-densie


I never heard of the catalytic convertor being a fire hazard.  I always thought the biggest problem with them was the replacing of them, because they were so expensive.  If you stopped at 74, how come you have the 76?  Dont it have a catalytic convertor?

JIM CLC # 15000

  • Guest
Re: If going for Big Car Comfort....
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2005, 12:44:21 AM »
02-25-05
JOE, not to worry, the Corintians are on the same endargered list as the NAGA. (Nagahide)
Good Luck, just dont order seats covered with "Spoted Owl", Jim

densie

  • Guest
Re: Go for the 76 Fleetwood
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2005, 01:06:48 AM »

  Yes, but a 3-way funeral coach, that is within towing distance to Tucson, is kind of a rare find.  So, even though it was a 76, I grabbed it.

  I recall that the owners manual of at least one of my Cadillacs says not to park it over anything combustible because the cat gets so hot that it could ignite it.

  I had a POS 87 Buick that had trouble starting one day, and the cat got so hot that the carpet started smoking, and my 78 Deville had the usual floorboard rust above the cat.  I guess there wasnt any kind of heat shield above it.

-densie

Rusty Shepherd CLC 6397

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Re: Go for the 76 Fleetwood
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2005, 08:21:54 AM »
Not really.

Rusty Shepherd CLC 6397

  • Guest
Easy steering
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2005, 09:20:00 AM »
My not really reply was to the question of "isnt it nice to know you could steer this car with your tongue if you wanted to?"

David #19063

  • Guest
Mopars vs. GMs (kinda long but good)
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2005, 12:06:35 PM »
Denise,

I will tell you my observations regarding the full size Mopars and GMs Ive owned which apply to this conversation.

1963 Olds 98 Luxury Sedan (which is a 4D 6 window hardtop) 394-4
1964 Olds 98 Luxury Sedan 394-4
1965 Chrysler New Yorker 4D Sedan 413-4
1967 Buick Wildcat Custom 4DHT 430-4
1967 Plymouth Fury II 4D Sedan 383-2
1968 Plymouth Fury III 4DHT 383-2
1968 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham 4DHT Sedan 472-4
1968 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 2DHT 472-4
1969 Buick Electra 225 Custom 4DHT 430-4
1969 Chrylser 300 2DHT 440-4
1970 Olds 98 4DHT 455-4
1971 Buick Electra 225 Custom 2DHT 455-4

The Cadillacs and Chryslers will have the most toys, especially the upscale models in each line.

The Buicks easily blow the doors of the competition.  No question.  Even my low compression 455 71 Electra will easily show it tail lights to the high compression 472s and Cadillacs has more perfomance rear axel gear than the Electra.  Then the 413 & 440 Chryslers, the Olds and then the Cadillacs.

The Mopars have the best and coldest AC, the most trouble free.  Although, both the Plymouths had issues with the fan relay.

GMs have the best power windows.  Mopar power windows are troublesome when they do work, but many times rear ones will not.

Important ones for Denise

Steering is very easy in all...almost no connection to the road.

The ride in all are very good, almost no connection to the road.  However, even with new shocks and tires, the Mopars kind of have a little Jeep feel to them.  I think it has to do with the torsion bar front end & maybe rear leaf springs.  

The ride in the Buicks, Cadillacs, and the Oldss were excellent, soft and plus (if you are into that).  You are so isolated from the road.  Rail Road track are generally just mere sounds in the big GMs.  

More body roll in cornering for the GMs than Mopars.

With that said, if I had to run a slalom, the Mopars would do better.  But, Ive never had cones pop up on the road for me to Slalom (but it is a fanatsy of mine...LOL).

70s cars issues.  

Electronic ignition is a plus over points, but installing a Mallory Unilite or Pertronix is so easy on cars with points.

As the 70s continued, the performance severely waned and the gas mileage dropped.  71s still pretty stout runners.  72s can be iffy.  Some 73s just do not want to idle or run right it seems.  74s and later are...well, just neutered in the power department.  Sluggish.  

I was at the drag strip in Houstom with the OCA Chapter there.  My battered 140,000 mile oil burning 70 98 4DHT ran a 16.2 sec 1/4 mile.  A near concours restored 76 98 Brougham 2DHT also with the 455-4 would only run a 19.2 sec. 1/4...maybe it was 18.2 sec., but either way, in a word "pathetic".

In comparison, my 69 Electra ran 15.2 sec and my 71 Electra ran 15.5 sec.  In comparison, I only ran my 68 Fleetwood Brougham in the 1/8 mile, but it would have equated to about 16.5 to 16.7 sec.  But it did take 1st place bracket racing at Buick Nationals 2002!  $100 Woohoo!

(Warning, shameless ego plug below!)

http://www.buickclub.org/Misc/2002dragrace.htm

Although they ride better than the late 60s and early 70s models, I just remember all the problems, especially engine and carb problems, pinging, people had with their mid-late 70s cars.  Remember, many of these cars, even though low compression, still recommended 91 octane...as compared to the high compressions requirement of 96 octane.

Now, my just purchased 94 Fleetwood Brougham really reminds me of the ride in my olds cars.  Near enough as soft as them, but it probably handles better.  The steeing takes a slight little more effort than the old ones, but does not wander as much and had a steering stablizer shock absorber which really takes away vibrations and jerks from potholes and grooved and worn roads.

The easiest steering is on my current 56 Chrysler Windsor.  Massive power steering, skinny bias ply tires, and a steering wheel so big you could drop Ohio in it and rattle the state around!  Remember, the steering wheel size and turns to lock was designed for no power steering cars.

I suggest that you go now and test drive a some 94-96 Fleetwood Broughams and Roadmasters for sale and see how they ride and steer.  I read somewhere and have heard that the Fleetwood Brougham was given a slightly stiffer suspension than the Roadmaster, maybe due to the Fleetwoods longer frame, wheelbase, and overall length.

Also, test drive some 70s cars.

Do long test drives, in town and on the interstate.  And do many of them with different cars.  

I think people make too many snap decisions when buying a new car they are not familiar with.  

Some new car dealerships will let you take a car over the weekend.  

If not, rent the same car for a week, drive the *****out of it.  See if you like the seats, the handling, the heater/AC controls, visability, ride, steering, performance, etc.  Take a trip in it.  Spending $250-$400 for a weeks rental is a small price compared to the price a new cars, $15,000 - $50,000+, and having a car you do not like.

Remember, these are my observations and opinions.  

And I welcome, comment and debate.

David

densie

  • Guest
Re: Mopars vs. GMs (kinda long but good)
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2005, 09:15:54 PM »
>he Mopars have the best and coldest AC, the most trouble free. Although, both the Plymouths had issues with the fan relay.

   The 70s Cadillacs had issues with that.  For some reason that I will never understand, they wired the relay through the alternator light circuit.

   I stay away from the 90s cars, unless they have the 350 TBI engine.  I learned my lesson about GM sequential fuel injection the hard way.  Either its under warranty or its simple enough for me to repair.  After spending the week messing with computers, I want nothing to do with the one in my car.  Im ready to come home and weld some metal together or something.

-densie

densie

  • Guest
Re: Easy steering
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2005, 09:42:05 PM »

  Ummm...

  Im just gonna have to let this one go.

-densie

Rusty Shepherd CLC 6397

  • Guest
Re: Easy steering
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2005, 10:14:40 AM »
Good idea...thanks.

 

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