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Author Topic: The global car industry  (Read 1638 times)

Porter 21919

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The global car industry
« on: September 09, 2005, 12:12:08 PM »
"How merger mania has been a disaster for the worlds great car manufacturers

THE star of the huge Frankfurt Motor Show, which opens on September 12th, may well be the latest luxury Mercedes-Benz S-class, the model on which the German company is relying to repair its faded reputation for superior quality. But the more significant event at the show will be the presence on display for the first time of three different vehicles made in China by local firms and destined for export. Already the first Chinese cars for Europes roads are being unloaded in Rotterdam. Plans are well under way for Chinese models to be sold in America as well. "

http://www.economist.com/business/displayStory.cfm?story_id=4369762

Denise 20352

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2005, 01:14:33 PM »

  Maybe China will surprise us all by delivering a comfortable luxury car, since no one else can do it.

-denise

Doug Houston

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2005, 05:53:30 PM »
There is a lot to be thought of and to be said about the globalization of industry as well as rule over the masses of the world.

The first wave of industrialists to head for communist China included General Motors among many others. Do you wonder why the big capitalists gravitate toward the communist countries? In a communist country, government owns all means of production. Government sets wages. If another countrys industry underprices the communist state, the wages are simply cut, and competition is eliminated. Workers in any communist state are slave laborers.  Also, the big multinational corporations (you know, the red, white and blue, apple pie, etc.) have to deal only with the communist governments. Multinational corporations have no national allegiance. Those in control of them have no souls.

So, with a communist economy to deal with, the multinationals are pleased to cut deals with the likes of China. Its open to speculation just how well the cars made in China will be received in countries like this which have been gutted of industry. The same applies to Germany.

Another thing that could disturb us if we thought about it is that if China elects to cut off essential goods to this country as an act of agression, and leave us high and dry,and it wont be  long before they can do it. They can have our country in their hands, and we will be without alternatives. The multinationals will be delighted to leave this country and relocate to communist China, and they wouldnt ever shed a tear for our despair. Just remember, communist China is an  enemy of the American people. Its no secret; theyve said it themselves.

And what about if Chinas government decides to kick out the multinational corporations and nationalize the means of production for themselves. Why not? Get the dummies to build up an industrial base, then snatch it out from under them. The moguls of the multinationals also havent much common sense.

Just a thought, of course.

Denise

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2005, 06:16:09 PM »

  I agree.  Its coming.

  The smart thing to do is buy up all of those inexpensive machine tools that are made in China, then it wont take long for us to tool back up.

-denise

Porter 21919

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2005, 07:05:45 PM »
Good comments Doug, we will always have to maintain some manufacturing capacity for the military/defense department though.

China has already stolen technology or plants from the multinationals, probably part of their master plan.

Clinton gave them missile technology but no surprise here, I know he and his wife are Marxists.

Porter ( never owned a foreign brand car, never will, I have owned 3 Chevy trucks, 2 Corvettes, 4 Cadillacs and 2 Ford trucks, the Fords were a mistake ) The current stable is a 90 Chevy Van, 66 & 67 CDVs)









David Leger CLC#19256

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2005, 10:09:19 AM »
Years ago, when I worked in aerospace/defense, a book was published in Japan titled The Japan That Can Say No.  Someone who had a chance, took a copy and had it translated into English.  Basically, it talked about withholding high technology products to control the US.  You can see copies out on the net, one such is at http://home.earthlink.net/~rufusis/japanno/part01.html .  Id suggest reading the introduction link before the document.  The owner of the defense firm I worked for was so rattled by this that he had copies run off for every employee (around 1400 of us at the time).

Doug Houston

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2005, 12:20:01 PM »
If you were to take a deep look into the affairs that led us where we are today, youd find things like that Japanese book. One thing that isnt taught us in school is that history is planned. It doesnt just happen as time goes by. For instance, plans for World War Ii were well under way in the early twenties.  Following WWII, at the Yalta conference, the Korean and Vietnam wars were planned. The reason that all the years passed between the two world wars was for the logistics of the war had to be set up, and another generation of boys grown for consumptrion in that new war.

In the early 1980s, I got a copy of an 8 page writeup, titled "The Trilateral Deindustrialization Plot". It  stated the strategy whereby the USA would be cleaned out of industry, and converted to a service economy. Naturally, I was labeled an idiot, and a doomsayer (and a few other things Id prefer not to mention) because iof it. Well, funny thing, Its all happened. I can read throuigh the thing now, and it was todays history in the planning stage. Knowing what I do about the planners, I have little cause for optimism. However else, our country will be gutted in the future, I dont know. You can bet though, the plans are laid. I probably will be long gone, so, let the doubting Thomases cope with the pieces that will be left for them.

Al Smith

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Re: The global car industry
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2005, 01:29:59 PM »
Many true statements here. Unfortunately we live in an economic society based soley on greed. Well cry & moan, but like the group of lemmings we are, we will buy the lowest priced item. Even if it were designed, built, marketed & delivered by Lucifer himself. Sad really.

Ed Dougher

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Misplaced Hand Wringing
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2005, 03:27:30 PM »
Looking at real (inflation-adjusted) goods production as a share of real GDP, one sees that not only has manufacturing not fallen, it has increased its share of GDP.

In 1950, real goods production accounted for 37.3 percent of real GDP, according to the Department of Commerce; last year it accounted for 39.8 percent.

Indeed, manufacturing hit its lowest share of real GDP in the early 1960s -- the "good old days" for many people -- and has risen almost continuously since.

 

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