Cadillac for sale

Started by Whit, August 17, 2018, 05:22:28 PM

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Whit

Saw this car the other day...looked very good...guy wants to sell it for $80K...I have no idea of it's worth. Just a FYI. Any thoughts?

Whit

G Pennington

NADA shows $67,600 for "high retail" (nicely restored).
Values for '40s cars have deteriorated over the last few years.
Gary Pennington
   1953 6267X Convertible
   1941 6267D Convertible (2 door)

Bob Hoffmann CLC#96

That valuation is a REAL travesty!!! It means that almost no pre-war cars of that type will now  be restored. Buy a restored one & junk yours. Sad!!!
Bob
1968 Eldorado slick top ,white/red interior
2015 Holden Ute HSV Maloo red/black interior.
             
Too much fun is more than you can have.

jdemerson

Wow!   That is an extremely nice looking 1941, at least based on your photo. And that model is the very last Cadillac Convertible Sedan -- rare in 1941.  He may get 80...I wish him well.

John Emerson
1952 Cadillac Sedan 6219X
John Emerson
Middlebury, Vermont
CLC member #26790
1952 Series 6219X
http://bit.ly/21AGnvn

Barry M Wheeler #2189

#4
Not the way the hood lines up with the fender... Way too much gap for a high $$$ car.  Nor no black in the indent on the fender spears. How long ago did I discover that, Bob? It must have been 1965 or so when I found that NOS one on a 2"x4" brace in the loft of the Shelbyville, IN Cadillac dealer. When I did the ones on Jack Miller's grey car which is in Vegas now I was lying on my back along the car to fill in the black for him.
Barry M. Wheeler #2189


1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville

Bob Hoffmann CLC#96

Come on, Barry!!! Don't join the ranks of the resident nitpickers & naysayers.
Bob
1968 Eldorado slick top ,white/red interior
2015 Holden Ute HSV Maloo red/black interior.
             
Too much fun is more than you can have.

STS05lg

Quote from: Bob Hoffmann CLC#96 on August 17, 2018, 09:19:57 PM
That valuation is a REAL travesty!!! It means that almost no pre-war cars of that type will now  be restored. Buy a restored one & junk yours. Sad!!!
Bob

Bob, it appears to be the case, at our three last big shows not a single pre-war car and just a few years ago we would have 10 or more show up some driven as far as 80 miles to the show. Not any more.

Mike Josephic CLC #3877

That sure is a beautiful example and I love the color.

You could not even begin to restore one for $80k. 
As a previous poster said you don't see many of this
type at shows any longer.  Maybe 25 years ago, not
now.

Mike
1955 Cadillac Eldorado
1973 Cadillac Eldorado
1995 Cadillac Seville
2004 Escalade
1997 GMC Suburban 4X4, 454 engine, 3/4 ton
custom built by Santa Fe in Evansville, IN
2011 Buick Lucerne CX
-------------------------------------
CLCMRC Museum Benefactor #38
Past: VP International Affiliates, Museum Board Director, President / Director Pittsburgh Region

Scot Minesinger

Prewar cars are difficult because unlike say a 1971 Cadillac in good mechanical shape, as they are not best on the highway with modern traffic.  You cannot drive them like you can the mid-late 1950's and newer that were engineered as highway cruisers.  Things change and I see the prewar cars dropping in show appearances and popularity.  They are beautiful though.
Fairfax Station, VA  22039 (Washington DC Sub)
1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible
1970 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1970 four door Convertible w/Cadillac Warranty

59-in-pieces

Bob,
You won't see me on the "... join the ranks of the resident nitpickers & naysayers.".
Mine is only a 47 convrt, but I lusted a long time after a 41 four door convrt, but couldn't afford one.

I just drive classics for my own enjoyment and don't lament the ups and downs of people's opinions of value or trends in the market.
That will be a problem for my sons - if they don't also just keep driving what I leave behind.

Have fun,
Steve B.
S. Butcher

G Pennington

QuoteThat valuation is a REAL travesty!!! It means that almost no pre-war cars of that type will now  be restored. Buy a restored one & junk yours. Sad!!!
Bob
I cannot think of ANY Cadillac, pre-war or post-war, that is worth more than the cost of a full restoration.  Sure, it's possible to buy something below market from a desperate or naïve seller, do a half-assed "restoration", sell to an uneducated buyer with more money than brains, and turn a profit, but that's the exception more than the rule (except on TV).
A restoration of any car should be undertaken for the love of the car, the thrill of the challenge, bragging rights, an excuse to get out of the house, or whatever.  But you can't worry about being upside down financially.
Gary Pennington
   1953 6267X Convertible
   1941 6267D Convertible (2 door)

Lexi


35-709

1935 Cadillac Sedan resto-mod "Big Red"
1973 Cadillac Caribou - Sold - but still in the family
1950 Jaguar Mark V Saloon resto-mod - Sold
1942 Cadillac 6269 - Sold
1968 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
1935 Glenn Pray - Auburn Boattail Speedster, Gen. 2

Brett Baird

Quote from: Scot Minesinger on August 18, 2018, 03:24:25 PM
Prewar cars are difficult because unlike say a 1971 Cadillac in good mechanical shape, as they are not best on the highway with modern traffic.  You cannot drive them like you can the mid-late 1950's and newer that were engineered as highway cruisers. 

I drive my '41 60S on the freeway all the time, and I drove it 900+ miles round trip to each of the Grand Nationals in Las Vegas.  450 miles per day there and back on I-15.  I will admit that I think that 65 to 70 miles per hour is fast enough for a 77 year old car though, so I kept in the right lane through those 80mph stretches.
B Baird
17764
'41 Fleetwood 60 S  http://bit.ly/1jwgEWm
'59 Sedan DeVille 6339 "Flat-top"  http://bit.ly/1jwgUF1

JoeKarasinski

That front sheet metal is the worst car to align perfectly. To get it perfect you literally need to do a custom job. Reworking the metal adding to it in places and removing in others. We worked many many hours on ours trying to make it perfect but that was after paint. No way we were going to star from scratch at that point.

Barry M Wheeler #2189

Joe, I will agree that aligning things on a '41 is difficult. I can't remember where I saw "how to do it" from GM, but as I recall, it was an involved process. I guess I just get annoyed at sellers wanting extremely high dollar prices and it's not "perfect." And I will readily admit that should I suddenly come into funds to buy the car, that I could "live with it."
Barry M. Wheeler #2189


1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville

Chris Bryant #19358

Hello folks,

The National Street Rod Association Safety 23 sticker in the vent window indicates it might be a resto-rod, although they will inspect stockers as well.

Cheers,

Chris Bryant #19358

Whit

To add to the consternation, here are a couple of other photos that I had on my phone. The guy said that the car is bone stock and not a resto-mod.

Just FYI    Whit

harvey b

The safety 23 sticker is so it could be judged at a NSRA event,the cars to be judged have to have one,it was most likely entered in a show sometime,it is a beautiful car. Harvey
Harvey Bowness

35-709

That is correct, the NSRA will not judge a car that does not have a current (once a year) NSRA inspection sticker.
1935 Cadillac Sedan resto-mod "Big Red"
1973 Cadillac Caribou - Sold - but still in the family
1950 Jaguar Mark V Saloon resto-mod - Sold
1942 Cadillac 6269 - Sold
1968 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
1935 Glenn Pray - Auburn Boattail Speedster, Gen. 2