Author Topic: 1941 floor pans  (Read 465 times)

Offline falcongto@hotmail.com

  • Posts: 16
  • Name: Robbie Weast
1941 floor pans
« on: April 13, 2020, 01:31:08 PM »
I've recently purchased a 41 series 61 and it will need some floor pan work for sure.  From what I've seen online no one repops a series 61 specific pan.  The 62 series pans I've seen have far less stiffening reveals and apparently don't have the body braces underneath.  Am I missing something or are my assumptions correct?  I can fab from scratch but it will be a ton of work.  Is there a better Pontiac/Chevy/Olds pan out there that is better quality that would be close to working?  Same question for the trunk.  Any intel would be much appreciated.

Offline Barry M Wheeler #2189

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  • CLC Number: 2189
  • Name: Barry Wheeler
Re: 1941 floor pans
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2020, 10:37:38 PM »
They would be the same if they had the GM "B" body. Which is to say, the "fastback." What you have to realize is that fewer and fewer people are interested in the older cars now. It costs just as much to set up tooling for your car as it does for a 1955-1957 Chevrolet Bel Air. Which is the better investment of capitol? A part you might sell a few dozen sets for a year, or a part you sell several dozen sets per month?

The Series 62 sets will work, with some cutting and pasting. The reason you don't find Series 61 items is that the car is not a CCCA Classic, was the cheapest one of the line, and you simply can't get any kind of return on your investment "totally" restoring one of them. (It was my first car, so I'm not trying to denigrate your car by any means.)

Make a repair that is safe and solid, and then cover it up. No one is going to know besides you. If you wish confirmation about whether or not you should put a ton of $$$ in the car, I can direct you to a gentleman who spent months and months trying to get some kind of decent return for his national prize winning 1941 Series 6109 four door.

You can hammer out the stiffening ribs in a piece of sheet stock without too much trouble. I made a patch some years ago for a 1941 Series 62 sedan and it turned out well. Best of luck. I've had two Series 62 coupes over the years.
Barry M. Wheeler #2189


1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville

Offline falcongto@hotmail.com

  • Posts: 16
  • Name: Robbie Weast
Re: 1941 floor pans
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2020, 02:51:45 PM »
Thank you for the response Barry.  I appreciate the thoughts on ROI but I have no plans to sell this car.  When I restored my 70 goat I knew the amount of $$ i dumped into I'd never see back but since I'm a till death do us part owner it's not really a concern.  I'm more concerned in what appears to be a huge lack of the stiffening ribs in the pans available.  Did you notice this on the replacement pans you bought?  I can always add stiffening by bead rolling additional ribs or simply run a thicker gauge flat sheet... but of course it would be easier just to start with a semi correct repop hence this thread.

Offline Barry M Wheeler #2189

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  • Posts: 3455
  • CLC Number: 2189
  • Name: Barry Wheeler
Re: 1941 floor pans
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2020, 05:46:00 PM »
Hi Robbie,
I've never had one of the reproduction sets. All I did was get a sheet of steel, then hammer out the ribs with a heavier, and somewhat narrower piece of steel. It wasn't pretty, but aligned with what remained of the original floor, it worked pretty well. It sounds as if you can figure out something. If you need help with anything, there are lots of 1941 guys on the Forum. I had my first 1941 Series 61 coupe in 1958, and the second as my driver after we came home from Berlin in 1964.
Barry M. Wheeler #2189


1981 Cadillac Seville
1991 Cadillac Seville

Offline C Gorgas

  • Posts: 162
Re: 1941 floor pans
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2020, 07:30:16 PM »
I have a solution for you that is relatively easy comparatively speaking but you may not like it. Make a cardboard match for the floor and tape it in from the underside of the car. Cover the cardboard with wax paper before you tape it to the floor. Next fiberglass your the area you are closing up. It will dry in a day or so then put a second coat of fiberglass. You need the area to be warm preferably around 70 degrees or higher. Once the fiberglass sets up you should be able to remove the cardboard and wax paper. Get a can of seam sealer and brush it on. It is a rather stiff compound but will make a nice appearance and the fiberglass imprint will not be visible; Put it on top and bottom. With time that area will be real solid and waterproof. Hope this helps. Chet

Offline falcongto@hotmail.com

  • Posts: 16
  • Name: Robbie Weast
Re: 1941 floor pans
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2020, 01:39:36 PM »
Thank you for the response guys.  Probably going to fab mine own repair panels.  Nothing against fiberglass repairs I just like any excuse to fire up the welder....it's been lonely lately.  I'm used to restoring cars that have tons of aftermarket support such as GM A bodies and Mustangs so this 41 will be an adventure for sure.  Just curious can anyone shoot me a topside view pic of their factory 62 series floor pan?  I'm curious to just visually compare it to my 61 series.

Offline Poncholover

  • Posts: 178
  • Name: D Snodgrass
Re: 1941 floor pans
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2022, 09:03:06 PM »
Saw your engine post & will be following but wonder how your floor boards came out?
I would think that Buick, Olds & Pontiac B bodies would be close? Bet there are parts out there...
Flattie Caddy

 

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